chromophobe


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to chromophobe: chromophobe adenoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

chromophobe

 [kro´mo-fōb]
any cell, structure, or tissue that does not stain readily; applied especially to the chromophobe cells of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

chro·mo·phobe

(krō'mō-fōb),
Resistant to stains, staining with difficulty or not at all; denoting certain degranulated cells in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.
Synonym(s): chromophobic
[chromo- + G. phobos, fear]

chromophobe

/chro·mo·phobe/ (-fōb) any cell or tissue not readily stainable, such as the chromophobe cells in the adenohypophysis.

chromophobe

(krō′mə-fōb′) also

chromophobic

(-fō′bĭk)
adj.
Not staining readily with dye. Used of a cell or cell structure.

chromophobe

chro·mo·phobe

(krō'mō-fōb)
Resistant to stains, staining with difficulty or not at all; denoting certain degranulated cells in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.
Synonym(s): chromophobic.
[chromo- + G. phobos, fear]

chromophobe

Resistant to biological stains. This property can be an important distinguishing characteristic in identifying some cells. Chromophobe cells are those with granules that do not take up dyes.

chromophobe

any cell, structure or tissue that does not stain readily; applied especially to the chromophobe cells of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

chromophobe adenoma
a nonfunctional pituitary tumor of the pars distalis is hormonally inactive but commonly causes clinical signs by compression of the pituitary gland and other nearby structures. Clinical signs include incoordination, weakness and exercise intolerance, muscle atrophy, sexual inactivity, blindness and dilatation and fixation of the pupils.
chromophobe carcinoma
rare nonfunctional pituitary tumors are usually large and invasive causing destruction of the pars distalis leading to panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. There is extensive invasion of the brain and cranial bones, and metastases to spleen and liver and to regional lymph nodes may occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunohistochemical studies were not done on the resected primary kidney tumour of these cases as morphologic features were classical of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.
11) Kwast and colleagues suggest there may be a subset of oncocytomas sharing the genetic and molecular features of chromophobe RCC, thus explaining the rare occurrence of metastasis.
Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma was first described in 1985 (1) and is thought to be derived from the intercalated cells of the collecting ducts (2).
Oncofetal protein IMP3: a novel molecular marker that predicts metastasis of papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.
The current classification of renal cell carcinoma includes four main types: conventional (clear cell), papillary, chromophobe, and collecting duct carcinoma, as well as unclassified renal cell carcinoma.
Oncocytotic cells are found in numerous RCCs, such as chromophobe RCC, the granular cell variant of RCC, and the eosinophilic variant of papillary type RCC (type 2).
9) In 1997, the Heidelberg classification of renal tumours identified 5 histologic types of renal cancer: conventional, papillary, chromophobe, collecting duct, and unclassifiable.
Of the currently recognized renal tumors, 3 types--clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC), and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC)--account for approximately 90% to 95% of all malignant kidney tumors in adults.
Based on morphologic, cytogenetic, and molecular criteria, there are five distinguishable types of RCC: clear cell (60%-80%), papillary (7%-14%), chromophobe (4%-10%), oncocytic (2%-5%), and collecting duct carcinomas (1%-2%) (12, 13).
Previous studies have documented PAX2 expression in various primary renal neoplasms, including 84% to 93% for clear cell RCC, 18% to 87% for papillary RCC, 9% to 83% for chromophobe cell RCC, and 14% to 87% for oncocytoma.
There are 4 basic types of renal tumors: clear cell, which comprises 75% to 80% of all kidney cancers; papillary, which comprises 10% to 15%; chromophobe, which comprises 5%; and oncocytoma, which comprises 5%.
Choueiri and colleagues (11) showed that patients with papillary RCC (PRCC) and chromophobe RCC (ChRCC) may have prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) with sunitinib and sorafenib, although clinical responses remain overall low in PRCC.