chromium


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Related to chromium: Chromium picolinate

chromium

 (Cr) [kro´me-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 24, atomic weight 51.996. (See Appendix 6.) It is an essential dietary trace element, but hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic.
chromium 51 a radioactive isotope of chromium having a half-life of 27.7 days and decaying by electron capture, emitting gamma rays. It is used to label red blood cells for measurement of red cell mass or volume, survival time, and sequestration studies, and for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding, and is used to label platelets to study their survival. Symbol 51Cr.

chro·mi·um (Cr),

(krō'mē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 24, atomic wt. 51.9961. A dietary essential bioelement. 51Cr (half-life of 27.70 days) is used as a diagnostic aid in many disorders (for example, gastrointestinal protein loss).
[G. chroma, color]

chromium

/chro·mi·um/ (Cr) (kro´me-um) a chemical element, at. no. 24. It is an essential dietary trace element, but hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic.
chromium 51  a radioactive isotope of chromium having a half-life of 27.7 days and decaying by electron capture with emission of gamma rays (0.32 MeV); it is used to label red blood cells for measurement of mass or volume, survival time, and sequestration studies, for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding, and to label platelets to study their survival.
chromium trioxide  chromic acid.

chromium (Cr)

[krō′mē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
a hard, brittle metallic element. Its atomic number is 24; its atomic mass is 51.99. It does not occur naturally in pure form but exists in combination with iron and oxygen in chromite, a mineral found chiefly in Africa, Albania, Russia, and Turkey. Chromium strongly resists corrosion and is used extensively to plate other metals, harden steel, and, in combination with other elements, form colored compounds. Stainless steels are more than 10% chromium and strongly resist rusting. Traces of chromium occur in plants and animals, and there is evidence that this element may be important in human nutrition, especially in carbohydrate metabolism. Some experts estimate that the safe and adequate daily intake of chromium ranges from 0.1 to 0.2 mg, depending on the age of the individual. Workers in chromite mines are susceptible to pneumoconiosis caused by the inhalation of chromite dust particles that lodge in the lung. Chromate salts have been identified as potential carcinogens. Chromium 51 isotope is used in blood studies.

chromium

A metallic element (atomic number 24; atomic number 51.99), which is an essential mineral that potentiates the action of insulin and is present in trace amounts in various enzymes; chromium is present in various foods including brewers’ yeast, whole grains, peanuts, wheat germ and skim milk.

chro·mi·um

(Cr) (krō'mē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 24, atomic wt. 51.9961. A dietary essential bioelement, 51Cr (half-life of 27.70 days) is used as a diagnostic aid in many disorders (e.g., gastrointestinal protein loss).
[G. chrōma, color]

chromium,

n an essential mineral that is associated with glucose tolerance, high cholesterol, blocked arteries, glaucoma, obesity, diabetes, and hypoglycemia. Not for use by chil-dren or pregnant or nursing women. Also called
chromium picolinate, chromium polynicotinate, or
chromium chloride.

chro·mi·um

(krō'mē-ŭm)
A metallic element and essential dietary bioelement; used as diagnostic aid in many disorders (e.g., gastrointestinal protein loss).
[G. chroma, color]

chromium

a chemical element, atomic number 24, atomic weight 51.996, symbol Cr. See Table 6.

chromium-51
a radioisotope of chromium having a half-life of 27.8 days; used to label red blood cells to determine red cell volume and red cell survival time. Symbol 51Cr. See also cr51edta.
chromium nutritional deficiency
possibly causally related to the onset of diabetes mellitus in primates.
chromium trioxide
possibly carcinogenic in humans. See also chromate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the properties of fulvic acid, it is probable that the corrosion of chromium plating is caused by a sequence of reactions such as the following: the calcium chloride sprayed in large quantities in Russia and the fulvic acid in Russian soil give rise to an ion exchange reaction which generates hydrochloric acid and thereby reduces the pH value; fulvic acid bonds with chromium (to form a complex) giving rise to changes in chromium passivation film properties; and changes occur in the sacrificial protection effect of the plating film.
Chromium removal from waste water has been investigated using the activated carbon derived from coconut fibers coconut shells and acid treated coconut shells [7].
Most research has found that chromium supplements are ineffective at promoting weight loss or improving athletic performance.
The health risks from hexavalent chromium particles can include respiratory tract tumors.
Glendale water officials say their hope lies with an experimental $2 million system designed to remove chromium 6 - the first project of its kind in the nation.
At the conference, researchers revealed some exciting new health roles for chromium and reinforced some old ones.
The female offspring of the chromium (III)-treated fathers had markedly higher average serum corticosterone compared with offspring of vehicle-treated fathers (Figure 1C).
After evaluating chromium levels in 407 men who developed coronary heart disease over a five-year period, a significant relationship was found between overweight men with low chromium levels and an increase in the incidence of coronary heart disease; including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (heart attack).
In its Clinical Practice Recommendations 2000, the association stated that "the only known circumstance in which chromium replacement has any beneficial effect on glycemic control is for people who are chromium deficient as a result of long-term chromium-deficient parenteral nutrition.
People with diabetes should consider adding another component to the Cardiac Elixir: chromium, a trace mineral.
after initiation of chromium picolinate, 200 [Mu]g 3 times daily.