chromatophore


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Related to chromatophore: chromophore

chromatophore

 [kro-mat´o-for]
any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr),
1. A colored plastid, due to the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore
4. A colored plastid in plants, for example, chloroplasts, leukoplasts, etc.
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

/chro·mato·phore/ (-for) any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chromatophore

(krō-măt′ə-fôr′)
n.
1. Any of several types of pigment cells, especially one found in a fish, amphibian, or reptile.
2. A multicellular organ in cephalopods that contains pigment cells.
3. A specialized pigment-bearing organelle in certain photosynthetic bacteria.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr)
1. A plastid, colored because of the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore.
4. A colored plastid in plants (e.g., chloroplasts, leukoplasts).
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

A pigment-containing cell.

chromatophore

  1. (also called chromoplast) a pigmented PLASTID of plant cells which may be green due to the presence of chlorophyll or differently coloured because of the presence of CAROTENOID pigments. CHROMATOPHORES are often CHLOROPLASTS in which the pigment has broken down, as in the ripening of fruit.
  2. (in animals) a cell with pigment in the cytoplasm which can be dispersed or concentrated so changing the colour of the animal as a whole. Animals with this characteristic include frogs, chameleons, cephalopods.
  3. (in photosynthetic bacteria and CYANOBACTERIA) a membranous structure carrying photosynthetic pigments.

chromatophore

any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the response to neural stimulation of melanophores and leucophores is opposite: whereas in melanophores the action of neurotransmitters induces the rapid aggregation of melanosomes (and hence fading of the black coloration), in leucophores it induces the dispersion of pigment (whitening), and because the melanophores and leucophores that form chromatophore units may be innervated by the same fibers, this opposite response occurs simultaneously.
A grid was then superimposed on the diagram, and the shape (pointate or stellate) and number of chromatophores in each grid cell were recorded.
The pectoral and pelvic fin rays are yellow or orange, with hyaline membranes, the bases of the fins are light tan with many scattered dark brown chromatophores.
Molecular evidence also suggests a location in the skin: the chromatophores.
The mood swing signals pigment-containing cells in the skin called chromatophores to produce changes in skin color.
The researchers discovered this gene, for a protein called opsin, concentrated near chromatophores - tiny organs that consist of an elastic sac of red, yellow or black pigment tied to muscle fibres.
Researchers at the University of Bristol in the UK created soft and stretchy artificial muscles based on specialist cells called chromatophores that are found in some fish and reptiles.
Scientists copied these cells, called chromatophores, using synthetic materials, and found they changed colour at the flick of a switch when electrical currents passed through.
When placed on a chequered background the fish, by changing its chromatophores was able to assimilate with its surroundings by becoming chequered.
The pigments move in and out of the "arms" of the chromatophores to hide or reveal colored layers below.
But when hit with a flash of bluish light like that produced by headlight fish, they turn on skin pigments, called chromatophores, to become red in the blink of an eye.