chromatolysis


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Related to chromatolysis: calciphylaxis, wallerian degeneration, neuronophagia, Monckeberg arteriosclerosis, Astrocytes

chromatolysis

 [kro″mah-tol´ĭ-sis]
1. the solution and disintegration of the chromatin of cell nuclei.
2. disintegration of the Nissl bodies of a neuron as a result of injury, fatigue, or exhaustion.

chro·ma·tol·y·sis

(krō'mă-tol'i-sis),
The disintegration of the granules of chromophil substance (Nissl bodies) in a nerve cell body that may occur after exhaustion of the cell or damage to its peripheral process; other changes considered part of chromatolysis include swelling of the perikaryon and shifting of the nucleus from its central position to the periphery.
[chromato- + G. lysis, dissolution]

chromatolysis

/chro·ma·tol·y·sis/ (kro″mah-tol´ĭ-sis) disintegration of Nissl bodies of a neuron as a result of injury, fatigue, or exhaustion.

chromatolysis

(krō′mə-tŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The dissolution or disintegration of chromophil material, such as chromatin, within a cell.

chro·mat′o·lyt′ic (-măt′l-ĭt′ĭk) adj.

chro·ma·tol·y·sis

(krō'mă-tol'i-sis)
The disintegration of the granules of chromophil substance (Nissl bodies) in a nerve cell body that may occur after exhaustion of the cell or damage to its peripheral process.
Synonym(s): chromolysis.
[chromato- + G. lysis, dissolution]

chromatolysis

Loss of the ability of a part of a cell to take up a stain from microscopic purposes. Nuclear chromatolysis implies dissolution of the nucleus.

chromatolysis

nerve cell Nissl bodies degradation following peripheral nerve fibre damage

chromatolysis

1. the solution and disintegration of the chromatin of cell nuclei.
2. disintegration of the Nissl bodies of a neuron as a result of injury, fatigue or exhaustion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both occipital cortices showed markedly diminished thickness, diffuse microspongiosis of the neuropil, neuronal chromatolysis, and neuronal death.
In the central nervous system, the neural cell body undergoes chromatolysis with peripheral shifting of the Nissl bodies (stocked metabolites) and a decrease in their number.
This same drug also produced vestibulocochlear Wallerian-like degeneration and retinal ganglion cell chromatolysis in dogs treated for 14 weeks at 180 mg/kg/day, a dose that resulted in a mean plasma drug level similar to that seen with the 60 mg/kg/day dose.
Histopathologic studies showed moderate neuronal degeneration characterized by neuronal hyperchromatosis, chromatolysis, and satellitosis (Figure 2, panel A).
Within the first few hours to days, morphologic changes occur in the cell body with the advent of chromatolysis.