chromatid


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Related to chromatid: chromomere

chromatid

 [kro´mah-tid]
either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere that make up a chromosome and that divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid),
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

/chro·ma·tid/ (kro´mah-tid) either of two parallel, spiral filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome.

chromatid

(krō′mə-tĭd)
n.
Either of the two daughter strands of a replicated chromosome that are joined by a single centromere and separate during cell division to become individual chromosomes.

chromatid

[krō′mətid]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
one of the two identical, threadlike filaments of a chromosome. Chromatids are produced by the self-replication of the chromosome during interphase and are held together by a common centromere. During anaphase of mitosis and meiosis II, the chromatids separate to become daughter chromosomes.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid)
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

One of the two duplicated copies of a chromosome produced by replication while still connected at the CENTROMERE before separation at the subsequent cell division. Each chromatid becomes a new chromosome.
Chromatidclick for a larger image
Fig. 102 Chromatid . (a) Before duplication. (b) After duplication.

chromatid

one of a pair of duplicated CHROMOSOMES produced during the ‘S’ phase of the CELL CYCLE, which are joined together at the CENTROMERE. See Fig. 102 . During nuclear division the centromere splits (in anaphase of mitosis, anaphase 2 of MEIOSIS) to produce two separate chromosomes.

chromatid

either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome, and which divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

sister chromatid
a chromatid formed by a replicating chromosome during interphase; because they are derived from the one homolog and joined at the center they are exact copies of each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is now well-established that MN mainly originate from acentric chromosome fragments, acentric chromatid fragments or whole chromosomes that fail to be included in the daughter nuclei at the completion of telophase during mitosis because they did not attach properly with the spindle during the segregation process in anaphase [73].
ratios can be predicted from chromosome and random chromatid segregation
Frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE hydrocortisone and MEGT % of SCEs/ chromosomes (A) Treatment and doses Single Double Triple Quadruple (mg/kg b.
The alteration of sister chromatid exchange frequencies in Behcet's disease with and without HLA-B51.
Sharma, Sister chromatid exchange andchromosome aberrations induced by curcumine and Tartrazine on on mammalian cells in vivo.
Dynamic mosaicism occurs as a consequence of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) of the ring chromosome during replication, resulting in several unbalanced chromosome outcomes.
A study showed that people with exposure to environmental pollutants such as PAHs were associated with significant increases in carcinogen-DNA adducts (PAHDNA and aromatic adducts), in sister chromatid exchange including high-frequency cells, and in chromosomal aberrations as well as a doubling in the frequency of ras oncogene overexpression (Perera et al.
Metaphases were scored for CAs and included chromatid gaps, isochromatid gaps, breaks, fragments, etc.
Meiosis in holocentric chromosomes: kinetic activity is randomly restricted to the chromatid ends of sex univalents in Graphosoma italicum (Heteroptera).
The distribution of mitomycin C-induced sister chromatid exchanges in the euchromatin and heterochromatin of the Indian muntjac, Chromosoma 64: 97-107.
In recent years, sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis has been considered to be a sensitive method for detecting DNA damage.