chromatic

(redirected from chromaticism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chromatic

 [kro-mat´ik]
1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.

chro·mat·ic

(krō-mat'ik),
Of or pertaining to color or colors; produced by, or made in, a color or colors.

chromatic

/chro·mat·ic/ (kro-mat´ik)
1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.

chromatic

[krōmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
1 pertaining to color.
2 stainable by a dye.
3 pertaining to chromatin. Also called chromatinic.

chro·mat·ic

(krō-mat'ik)
Of or pertaining to color or colors; produced by, or made in, a color or colors.

chromatic 

Pertaining to colour.

chromatic

1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The shifting modal centers and pervasive chromaticism are typical of free composition in this style.
However, the prominence given to these features varies during the decade under scrutiny: while the early exploratory works exhibit a high level of chromaticism (p.
As the series progresses, there is a slight increase in rhythmic complexity, mainly with mild syncopation, chromaticism, finger and hand crossovers, and mixtures of articulations (although never vertically).
The brief prelude is noteworthy for its adventurous chromatic journey away from E major; this chromaticism foreshadows what will happen in the vocal line in the first half of the song.
Occasionally resorting to the Fauvist chromaticism he introduced in Eloge de l'amour, Godard allows his color-distorted images to flourish with intensely tinted flowers (psychedelic daisies, eye-searing poppies), shoved into the foreground so they may intrude into our space, and fixates on found loveliness: the bonfire of a woman's .
The music of Alfred does indeed include features that are deemed Wagnerian, such as characteristic motifs, chromaticism, thick orchestration, emancipated orchestra.
Chapters discuss chromaticism within and beyond tonality in Germany and Austria; Neoclassicism; early interests in color, noise, and new sonorities; extensions of the 12-tone system in and outside Vienna; the continuation and development of trends established before World War I and new trends between the wars; atonal and 12-tone techniques after World War II; musique concrete, electronic, and aleatoric movements; and composers in Europe, the US, Latin America, and Eastern Asia since the mid-1940s.
The inclusion of the Gesualdo work, with its sudden twists of harmony and chromaticism, is appropriate with the contemporary selections.
The CBSO, under Adrian Lucas, began with a portentous theme on strings with enough chromaticism to hint that something forbidding, maybe frightening, was on its way.
387 identifies the importance of chromaticism for the whole work, but does not review the subtle interplay between chromatic and diatonic elements, frequently in harness with dynamic contrast; the 'Haydn' quartets suggest a preoccupation with this field of expressive resources that takes a different form in each work.
The two-hour work is set to the twelve-tone music of Alban Berg and Arnold Schoenberg, and Richard Wagner's dense chromaticism, performed live by.
Some of the arias hang fire, but the score as a whole is remarkable for the flexibility with which Handel treated the forms and style of Italian opera in 1730; thematic cross-references, counterpoint and chromaticism also keep breaking in.