chromatic

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chromatic

 [kro-mat´ik]
1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.

chro·mat·ic

(krō-mat'ik),
Of or pertaining to color or colors; produced by, or made in, a color or colors.

chromatic

/chro·mat·ic/ (kro-mat´ik)
1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.

chromatic

[krōmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
1 pertaining to color.
2 stainable by a dye.
3 pertaining to chromatin. Also called chromatinic.

chro·mat·ic

(krō-mat'ik)
Of or pertaining to color or colors; produced by, or made in, a color or colors.

chromatic 

Pertaining to colour.

chromatic

1. pertaining to color; stainable with dyes.
2. pertaining to chromatin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gilbert Reaney (New York: Da Capo Press, 1970), 4, for the association between chromaticism and wantonness.
The chromaticism, too, looked to Faure and Szymanowski.
Neither is it only a matter of the revolutionary chromaticism that Wagner ventured, driving tonality to its limit (as in the much-discussed "Tristan Chord"), nor of his consequent influence on the theoretical developments definitive of the second Viennese school, without which twentieth-century music is unthinkable.
Occasionally resorting to the Fauvist chromaticism he introduced in Eloge de l'amour, Godard allows his color-distorted images to flourish with intensely tinted flowers (psychedelic daisies, eye-searing poppies), shoved into the foreground so they may intrude into our space, and fixates on found loveliness: the bonfire of a woman's .
Chapters discuss chromaticism within and beyond tonality in Germany and Austria; Neoclassicism; early interests in color, noise, and new sonorities; extensions of the 12-tone system in and outside Vienna; the continuation and development of trends established before World War I and new trends between the wars; atonal and 12-tone techniques after World War II; musique concrete, electronic, and aleatoric movements; and composers in Europe, the US, Latin America, and Eastern Asia since the mid-1940s.
Thank you for presenting Fanny Hensel's majestic "Fugue in E-flat Major," with its mighty octaves and chromaticism.
The CBSO, under Adrian Lucas, began with a portentous theme on strings with enough chromaticism to hint that something forbidding, maybe frightening, was on its way.
Here, on the model of Liszt, Foerster casts the form of the sonata cycle into a single continuous work, employs unusual harmony full of chromaticism and surprises us with a dramatic section enhanced by tremolo or the use of sul ponticello.
While the compositions explore modes, chromaticism and meter, they each bear Miles' own exquisite sound, along with his engaging rhythms, rising melodies and the distinctive work of his collaborators.
This strategy measures "degrees of deviance" along a chromatic slide, and this graded chromaticism seems to be based on a measure of mimetic efficacy.
He sensed his mission as the bringer of a salvational musical system that would lead harmonic usage out of the dead end of tonality vitiated by excessive chromaticism.
The two-hour work is set to the twelve-tone music of Alban Berg and Arnold Schoenberg, and Richard Wagner's dense chromaticism, performed live by.