chorea


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chorea

 [ko-re´ah]
the ceaseless occurrence of rapid, jerky involuntary movements. adj., adj chore´ic.
acute chorea Sydenham's chorea.
chronic chorea Huntington's chorea.
chorea gravida´rum sydenham's chorea in early pregnancy, with or without a previous history of rheumatic fever.
hereditary chorea (Huntington's chorea) see huntington's chorea.
Sydenham's chorea see sydenham's chorea.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă),
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is not known.
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]

chorea

/cho·rea/ (ko-re´ah) [L.] the ceaseless occurrence of rapid, jerky, dyskinetic, involuntary movements.chore´ic
acute chorea  Sydenham's c.
chronic chorea , chronic progressive hereditary chorea Huntington's c.
hereditary chorea , Huntington's chorea a hereditary disease marked by chronic progressive chorea and mental deterioration to dementia.
Sydenham's chorea  a self-limited disorder, occurring between the ages of 5 and 15, or during pregnancy, linked with rheumatic fever, and marked by involuntary movements that gradually become severe, affecting all motor activities.

chorea

(kô-rē′ə, kō-, kə-)
n.
Any of various disorders of the nervous system marked by involuntary, jerky movements, especially of the arms, legs, and face, and by incoordination.

cho·re′ic (-ĭk) adj.

chorea

[kôrē′ə]
Etymology: Gk, choreia, dance
a condition characterized by involuntary purposeless, rapid motions, as flexing and extending of the fingers, raising and lowering of the shoulders, or grimacing. The movements often appear to be well coordinated. In some forms the person is also irritable, emotionally unstable, physically weak, restless, and fretful. See also chorea gravidarum, Huntington's disease, Sydenham's chorea. choreic [kôrā′ik] , adj.

chorea

Neurology A condition characterized by involuntary but seemingly well-coordinated, rapid, complex, spastic movements. See Sydenham's chorea.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă)
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is unknown.
See also: Huntington chorea, Sydenhamchorea
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]

chorea

An involuntary, purposeless jerky movement, repeatedly affecting especially the face, shoulders and hips and caused by disease of the basal ganglia of the brain. Popularly called St. Vitus' dance. See HUNTINGTON'S CHOREA.

Chorea

A term that is used to refer to rapid, jerky, involuntary movements of the limbs or face that characterize several different disorders of the nervous system, including chorea of pregnancy and Huntington's chorea as well as Sydenham's chorea.

chorea

irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of limbs or facial muscles
  • Huntington's chorea; Huntington's disease see disease, Huntington's

    Sydenham's chorea; St Vitus' dance acute neurological disorder of young people triggered by group A haemolytic streptococcus infection, causing formation of autoantibodies directed against the basal ganglia; characterized by involuntary, irregular, jerky movements (of facial, neck and limb muscles) which are increased by effort and disappear during sleep

chorea (St. Vitus' dance) (kôrē´ə),

n a disorder of the central nervous system resulting in purposeless, involuntary athetoid (writhing) movements of the muscles of the face and extremities. It may be associated with or follow rheumatic fever (Sydenham's chorea), hysteria, senility, or infections, or it may be a hereditary disorder (Huntington's chorea).

chorea

in humans the ceaseless occurrence of rapid, jerky involuntary movements, but the term is usually applied to the myoclonus seen in dogs associated with infection by distemper virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deutetrabenazine was first studied in Huntington's chorea in a 13-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study (N = 90).
During the course of the disease, findings such as characteristic phenotype chorea, orofacial dyskinesia, involuntary vocalizations, dysarthria, and dystonia are accompanying symptoms in many patients.
Chorea and rapidly progressive subcortical dementia in antiphospholipid syndrome.
Signal changes in pons (Pattern 4) are seen in 20 cases of Parkinson's disease, 6 cases of Wilson's, 5 cases of chorea, 4 cases of atypical Parkinson's disease, 1 case of ataxia and dystonia.
Major criteria Low-risk populations (a) Moderate- and high-risk populations Carditis (b) (Clinical and/or subclinical) Carditis (b) (Clinical and/or subclinical) Arthritis (Polyarthritis only) Arthritis (Monoarthritis or polyarthritis or polyarthralgia (c)) Chorea Chorea Erythema marginatum Erythema marginatum Subcutaneous nodules Subcutaneous nodules C.
A literature review revealed that the onset of chorea in cases of BD varied from the time of onset of BD to 31 years after the onset of the disease (3).
After neurologic and psychiatric consultations, chorea in the course of TBE was diagnosed.
Keywords: Sydenham's chorea, acute rheumatic fever, streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis, child
The clinical signs of rheumatic chorea such as 'milkmaid grip', darting tongue and the pronator sign were present.
McCune noted that when the Michigan Lupus Epidemiology and Surveillance Program (MiLES) was established close to a decade ago, investigators chose to track only a subset of the 19 neuropsychiatric syndromes on the ACR list: seizure disorders, cerebrovascular accidents, psychosis, mononeuropathy, aseptic meningitis, acute transverse myelitis, chorea, and cranial neuropathy.
Some have drawn comparisons with a form of motion seen in sufferers of chorea, a neurological disorder characterized by irregular contractions that appear to flow from one muscle to the next.