chordoid

chordoid

[kôr′doid]
Etymology: Gk, chorde + eidos, form
resembling the notochord or notochordal tissue.

chordoid

adjective
(1) Referring or pertaining to the notochord.
(2) Referring to or resembling a chordoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
A chordoid glioma is a rare low-grade tumor that arises from the anterior wall or roof of the third ventricle.
The best imaging diagnostic tool for evaluation of chordoid gliomas is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain with gadolinium.
Immunohistochemical comparison of chordoma with chondrosarcoma, myxopapillary ependymoma, and chordoid meningioma.
Yet another type of larva, a chordoid, emerges from the eggs, swims to another lobster, and dies, leaving a few bud cells that develop into a feeding-stage larva.
No other variants (clear cell, chordoid, or papillary) were identified in the high-grade meningiomas.
The pathologic specimen from the initial resection of the right frontal tumor consisted of multiple rubbery fragments that demonstrated a meningioma with meningothelial and chordoid patterns (Figure 2, A and C).
Many areas exhibited a myxoid background with chondromatous matrix, but this was distinct from the chordoid pattern seen in the meningioma.
Correlation between clinicopathological features and karyotype in 100 cartilaginous and chordoid tumours: a report from the Chromosomes and Morphology (CHAMP) Collaborative Study Group.
Chordoid glioma: a case report and molecular characterization of five cases.
Some of the more significant changes affecting tumor grade include classifying (1) meningiomas showing central nervous system invasion as grade II rather than grade III, (2) meningiomas with 4 or more mitotic figures per 10 high-power fields (HPFs) as grade II, (3) clear cell and chordoid meningiomas as grade II, (4) papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas as grade III, and (5) tumors with 20 or more mitotic figures per 10 HPFs as grade III.
The intraosseous component consisted of what appeared to be a BNCT sharply juxtaposed to a proliferation of chordoid cells with minimal nuclear atypia in an intercellular myxoid matrix.
Within the meningeal neoplasm group, the most unusual cases were the sclerosing meningioma (patient 24; Figure 2, C) and the chordoid meningioma (patient 25; Figure 2, D) invading nerve, although the hemangiopericytoma (Figure 2, E), which had been mistaken for a possible schwannoma (Table), also showed small, neurofilament-positive nerve fibers buried deep with the lesion (patient 26; Figure 2, F).