notochord

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Related to chorda dorsalis: Chordata, Paraxial mesoderm

notochord

 [no´to-kord]
a cylindrical cord of cells on the dorsal aspect of an embryo, marking its longitudinal axis; the common factor of all chordates. It is the center of development of the axial skeleton.

no·to·chord

(nō'tō-kōrd),
1. In primitive vertebrates, the primary axial supporting structure of the body, derived from the notochordal or head process of the early embryo; an important organizer for determining the final form of the nervous system and related structures.
2. In embryos, the axial fibrocellular cord about which the vertebral primordia develop; vestiges of it persist in the adult as the nuclei pulposi of the intervertebral discs. Synonym(s): chorda dorsalis
[G. nōtos, back, + chordē, cord, string]

notochord

/no·to·chord/ (nōt´o-kord) a rod-shaped cord of cells on the dorsal aspect of an embryo, defining the primitive axis of the body and serving as the center of development of the axial skeleton; it is the common factor of all chordates.

notochord

(nō′tə-kôrd′)
n.
A flexible rodlike structure that is present in the embryos of all chordates and in the adult forms of certain groups, such as the lancelets and hagfishes. The notochord develops into the spinal column in most vertebrates.

no′to·chord′al adj.

notochord

[nō′tōkôrd]
Etymology: Gk, noton, back, chorde, cord
an elongated strip of mesodermal tissue that originates from the primitive node and extends along the dorsal surface of the developing embryo beneath the neural tube, forming the primary longitudinal skeletal axis of the body of all chordates. In humans and other higher vertebrates, the structure is replaced by vertebrae, although a remnant of it remains as part of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disks. See also neural tube. notochordal, adj.

no·to·chord

(nō'tō-kōrd)
1. In primitive vertebrates, the primary axial supporting structure of the body, derived from the notochordal or head process of the early embryo; an important organizer for determining the final form of the nervous system and related structures.
2. In embryos, the axial fibrocellular cord about which the vertebral primordia develop; vestiges of it persist in the adult as the nuclei pulposi of the intervertebral discs.
[G. nōtos, back, + chordē, cord, string]

notochord

A rod-like structure, present in early development, derived from the MESODERM and giving rise to the spine. In the adult, the notochord is represented by the pulpy centres (nucleus pulposus) of the intervertebral discs.

notochord

the longitudinal axial support (skeleton) of the embryos of all chordates, which lies ventral to the nerve cord and dorsal to the alimentary canal. Remnants of the notochord usually remain in the adult between the vertebrae, which come to surround it.

no·to·chord

(nō'tō-kōrd)
In embryos, the axial fibrocellular cord about which vertebral primordia develop; vestiges persist in the adult as the nuclei pulposi of the intervertebral discs.
[G. nōtos, back, + chordē, cord, string]

notochord (nō´təkôrd´),

n an elongated strip of mesodermal tissue that originates from the primitive node and extends along the dorsal surface of the developing embryo beneath the neural tube, forming the primary longitudinal skeletal axis of the body of all chordates.

notochord

a cylindrical cord of cells on the dorsal aspect of an embryo, marking its longitudinal axis; a defining characteristic of all chordates. It is the center of development of the axial skeleton. Its remnants in adult mammals are found in the pulpy centers of the intervertebral disks.