chorangiosis

chorangiosis

A diffuse multifocal foeto-vascular defect, defined as the presence of 10 areas in the placenta with 10 microscopic fields containing 10 villi with 10 capillary lumens. The significance of chorangiosis as an independent prognostic factor of adverse pregnancy outcome is uncertain, but it is thought to increase foetal morbidity and mortality.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional features that were noted on histology in the HIV-positive group included evidence of meconium exposure (n=10), focal infarct (n=1), focal decidual vasculopathy (n=1), dysmaturity (n=3), fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (n=1), chorangiosis (n=1), intervillous thrombus (n=2) and intervillous haemorrhage (n=3); and in the HIV-negative group, infarcts (n=2), decidual vasculopathy (n=1) and dysmaturity (n=2).
1,21,22) Capillary profiles can be highlighted by endothelial markers, for example, CD34, to facilitate counting; however, for the diagnosis of chorangiosis, the cutoff point of 20 lumens, instead of 10 lumens, on hematoxylin-eosin slide (23) should be used as more vascular lumens are seen by immunohistochemistry.
As with PR, the focal hypervascularity is an adaptive mechanism, reaching the level of chorangiosis in some cases, whereas, in other cases, the villous capillary profiles remain between 7 and 9 per chorionic villus (incipient or emerging chorangiosis).
Chorangiosis and its precursors: Underdiagnosed placental indicators of chronic fetal hypoxia.
Numerical criteria for the diagnosis of placental chorangiosis using CD34 immunostaining.
Examination of the placenta showed focal basal decidual inflammation, mild chorangiosis, and villus dys-maturity.
Moreover, such placental lesions, showing histologic evidence of meconium staining and chorangiosis, were more common with membrane hypoxic lesions occurring without, rather than with, infarctions.
In that study, the most common underdiagnoses included villous edema, villitis, chorangiosis, abnormal maturation, abnormal weight, meconium staining, and acute chorioamnionitis.
Microscopically it showed an increase in the number of vessels in the chorionic villi, a characteristic finding of chorangiosis.
The diagnostic criteria of chorangiosis were established by Altshuler[1] in 1984 as the presence of a minimum of 10 villi, each with 10 or more vascular channels, in 10 or more areas of 3 or more random, noninfarcted placental areas when using a X10 ocular (Figure, original magnification X10).
Chorangiosis is a placental change that has not been extensively studied.
Placental conditions that have been associated with chorangiosis include umbilical cord anomalies, single umbilical artery, abruptio placentae, placenta previa, chorangioma, amnion nodosum, and villitis (rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and Bartonella sp are known to infect and induce proliferation of the endothelial cells).