choosing death

choosing death

Deciding to die. In particular, an individual may choose to withdraw from chronic kidney dialysis with no medical reason for withdrawing. In one study, stopping dialysis in this situation was three times more common in patients treated at home than in those treated at dialysis centers.
See: death; death with dignity; do not attempt resuscitation; suicide
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Threquarters of GPs oppose assisted suicide, with reasons given including fears that a change in the law will result in less focus on investment in palliative care and the dangers of patients feeling pressured into choosing death.
A jury would have to be unanimous in choosing death, and a judge would hand out a life sentence if the jury is unable to reach a unanimous decision, reports Boston Globe.
I am not choosing death, I am choosing life, but I can't do it on my own.
But what such motorists ignore is the fact that they could end up in an accident because of someone else's fault and not wearing the seat belt is like choosing death over life.
Government hospitals are careless and the private sector tends to be weak, so people are really stuck between choosing death rather than life in both choices," he said.
Among the areas of concern are Christianity and the social responsibility of health care, care of patients and their suffering, embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, abortion, and choosing death.
Thus, in Shona society choosing death in whatever circumstances is considered harmful, destructive and a loss not only to the bearer of life but to family, friends and the community to which the one whose life is terminated is a member.
From this contrasting perspective, respect for autonomy in choosing death is a masquerade, hiding lack of adequate concern and caring for what is needed to make the lives of disabled persons worth living.
Unfortunately, many congregations are choosing death by default, she said.
His mother has long since left them, choosing death over hopelessness.
The question arises whether a competent person's right to exercise complete autonomy in choosing death is always valid.