chondrocalcinosis


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chondrocalcinosis

 [kon″dro-kal″sĭ-no´sis]
deposition of calcium salts in the cartilage of joints. When accompanied by attacks of goutlike symptoms, it is called pseudogout.

chon·dro·cal·ci·no·sis

(kon'drō-kal'si-nō'sis),
Calcification of cartilage.
[chondro- + calcium + G. -osis, condition]

chondrocalcinosis

/chon·dro·cal·ci·no·sis/ (-kal″sĭ-no´sis) the presence of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate, in the cartilaginous structures of one or more joints.

chondrocalcinosis

[kon′drōkal′sinō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, chondros + L, calyx, lime; Gk, osis, condition
an arthritic disease in which calcium deposits are present in the peripheral joints. It resembles gout and often occurs in patients over 50 years of age who have osteoarthritis or diabetes mellitus. It most commonly invades the knee joint. Aspiration of synovial fluid from the affected joints reveals crystals of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. Inflammation and pain may be relieved by intraarticular injections of hydrocortisone and by antiinflammatory medications. Also called pseudogout. Compare gout.
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Chondrocalcinosis

chondrocalcinosis

Pseudogout Rheumatology A chronic gout-like recurrent arthritis characterized by calcium pyrophosphate deposition in multiple joints

chon·dro·cal·ci·no·sis

(kon'drō-kal-si-nō'sis)
Calcification of cartilage.
[chondro- + calcium + G. -osis, condition]

chondrocalcinosis

The deposition of crystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in cartilage. Degenerative changes result and, in joints, a form of arthritis, known as PSEUDOGOUT, occurs.

chondrocalcinosis

cartilage calcification

chondrocalcinosis

deposition of calcium salts in the cartilage of joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hemochromatosis can cause chondrocalcinosis and inflammatory changes of the synovial joints (Figure 7).
Chondrocalcinosis polyarticularis (familiaris): Roentgenological and clinical analysis.
Inflammatory changes of the subchondral bone and chondrocalcinosis are also seen.
Incidentally, chondrocalcinosis was seen in the triangular fibrocartilage.
Our patient's radiographs revealed chondrocalcinosis of the triangular cartilage, which is suggestive of CPPD, but synovial fluid crystal analysis was not pursued.
Patients with previous midcarpal arthrodesis at other institutions or due to non-traumatic origin, such as chondrocalcinosis, were excluded from the study.
Furthermore, ferric salts promote the formation and deposition of intra-articular CPPD crystals by inhibiting the activity of synovial pyrophosphatase (manifested as chondrocalcinosis on radiographs) and by decreasing the clearance of intra-articular immune complexes by inhibiting the activity of synovial reticuloendothelial cells.