chondroblastoma

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chondroblastoma

 [kon″dro-blas-to´mah]
a benign tumor arising from young chondroblasts in the epiphysis of a bone.

chon·dro·blas·to·ma

(kon'drō-blas-tō'mă),
A benign tumor arising in the epiphyses of long bones, consisting of highly cellular tissue resembling fetal cartilage.

chondroblastoma

/chon·dro·blas·to·ma/ (kon″dro-blas-to´mah) a usually benign tumor derived from immature cartilage cells, occurring primarily in the epiphyses of adolescents.

chondroblastoma

[kon′drōblastō′mə] pl. chondroblastomas, chondroblastomata,
a benign tumor, derived from precursors of cartilage cells, that develops most frequently in epiphyses of the femur and humerus, especially in young men. The lesions may contain scattered areas of calcification and necrosis. Also called Codman's tumor.

chondroblastoma

A benign tumour that arises in the epiphysis or in secondary ossification centres of long bones (humerus, proximal and distal femur, proximal tibia) of young adults (< age 30).

Imaging
Well-defined lytic lesion with a fluffy cotton-wool appearance, ± sclerotic border.

chon·dro·blas·to·ma

(kon'drō-blas-tō'mă)
A benign tumor arising in the epiphyses of long bones, consisting of highly cellular tissue resembling fetal cartilage.

chondroblastoma

uncommon, painful or asymptomatic benign bone lesion of knee, talus and calcaneum, presenting on radiograph as a clearly defined round or oval bone lesion with a sclerotic border (see Table 1)
Table 1: Tumours arising in bone
Bone tumour typeExamples occurring in lower limb/foot
BenignAneurysmal bone cyst
Solitary osteochondroma
Simple/solitary bone cyst
Osteoid osteoma
Giant-cell tumour
Enchondroma
Chondroblastoma
MalignantChondrosarcoma
Ewing's sarcoma
Osteogenic sarcoma

chondroblastoma

a benign tumor arising from young chondroblasts in the epiphysis of a bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
In BST pathology, various tumors were reclassified, notably 3 cases with an external diagnosis of benign cartilaginous tumors (2 chondroblastomas and 1 enchondroma) that were revised and confirmed by subsequent surgery as osteosarcoma (2 cases) and chondrosarcoma (1 case).
Chondroblastomas are more common in men in their second or third decade.
Unusual benign and malignant chondroid tumors of bone: a survey of some mesenchymal cartilage tumors and malignant chondroblastic tumors, including a few multicentric ones, as well as many atypical benign chondroblastomas and chondromyxoid fibromas.
From the surgical pathology files of the State University of New York-Upstate Medical University Hospital in Syracuse, New York, from 1994 to 2009, 78 cases of giant cell lesions of bone and soft tissues, including 23 giant cell tumors of bone, 8 primary aneurysmal bone cysts, 15 tenosynovial giant cell tumors, 12 chondroblastomas, 4 giant cell reparative granulomas, 6 non-ossifying fibromas, 2 fibrous dysplasias, 4 pigmented villonodular synovitides, and 4 osteosarcomas with giant cells, were retrieved.
They found p63 overexpression in roughly 30% of chondroblastomas and aneurysmal bone cysts, but not in giant cell reparative granulomas, pigmented villonodular synovitides, or tenosynovial giant cell tumors.
The 2 previous studies did not show evidence of p63 overexpression in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumors, giant cell reparative granulomas, or pigmented villonodular synovitides, and the degree of p63 expression in aneurysmal bone cysts and chondroblastomas was significantly lower.
These include aneurysmal bone cyst, chondroblastoma, nonossifying fibroma, giant cell reparative granuloma, pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, and giant cell-rich osteosarcoma.
For instance, chondroblastomas almost always arise in the epiphysis.
Epithelioid and epithelial neoplasms seen in bone are rare and include epithelioid variants of vascular lesions, osteoblastoma, osteosarcoma, chordoma, and chondroblastoma as well as adamantinoma and metastatic carcinoma.
Those most commonly encountered include epithelioid vascular lesions (ie, hemangioma, hemangioendothelioma, and angiosarcoma), adamantinoma, epithelioid osteoblastoma, epithelioid osteosarcoma, chordoma, and epithelioid chondroblastoma.
Chondroblastoma tends to occur in the epiphyses of long bones in the second decade of life, frequently prior to closure of the epiphyseal plate.