cholinesterase inhibitor


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Related to cholinesterase inhibitor: Donepezil, acetylcholine, Memantine

inhibitor

 [in-hib´ĭ-tor]
1. any substance that interferes with a chemical reaction, growth, or other biologic activity.
2. a chemical substance that inhibits or checks the action of a tissue organizer or the growth of microorganisms.
3. an effector that reduces the catalytic activity of an enzyme.
ACE i's (angiotensin-converting enzyme i's) see angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
angiogenesis inhibitor a group of drugs that prevent growth of new blood vessels into a solid tumor.
aromatase i's a class of drugs that inhibit aromatase activity and thus block production of estrogens; used to treat breast cancer and endometriosis.
C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) a member of the serpin group, an inhibitor of C1, the initial component activated in the classical complement pathway. Deficiency of or defect in the protein causes hereditary angioedema.
carbonic anhydrase inhibitor an agent that inhibits the enzyme carbonic anhydrase; used in treatment of glaucoma and sometimes for epilepsy, familial periodic paralysis, acute mountain sickness, and kidney stones of uric acid.
cholinesterase inhibitor anticholinesterase.
COX-2 i's (cyclooxygenase-2 i's) a group of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs that act by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 activity; they have fewer gastrointestinal side effects than other NSAIDs. Two members of the group are celecoxib and rofecoxib.
gastric acid pump inhibitor an agent that inhibits gastric acid secretion by blocking the action of H+,K+-ATPase at the secretory surface of gastric parietal cells; called also proton pump i.
HIV protease inhibitor any of a group of antiretroviral drugs active against the human immunodeficiency virus; they prevent protease-mediated cleavage of viral polyproteins, causing production of immature viral particles that are noninfective. Examples include indinavir sulfate, nelfinavir mesylate, ritonavir, and saquinavir.
HMG-CoA reductase i's a group of drugs that competitively inhibit the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and are used to lower plasma lipoprotein levels in the treatment of hyperlipoproteinemia. Called also statins.
membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL) protectin.
monoamine oxidase inhibitor any of a group of drugs that inhibit the action of monoamine oxidase, the enzyme that breaks down norepinephrine and serotonin, prescribed for their antidepressant action; the most widely used ones are isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine. They are also used in the prevention of migraine.
α2-plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin.
plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) any of several regulators of the fibrinolytic system that act by binding to and inhibiting free plasminogen activator. Their concentration in plasma is normally low, but is altered in some disturbances of bodily hemostasis. PAI-1 is an important fast-reacting inhibitor of t-plasminogen activator and u-plasminogen activator. Its synthesis, activity, and release are highly regulated; elevated levels of it have been described in a number of disease states. PAI-2 is a normally minor inhibitor that greatly increases in concentration during pregnancy and in certain disorders. PAI-3 is protein C inhibitor.
platelet inhibitor any of a group of agents that inhibit the clotting activity of platelets; the most common ones are aspirin and dipyridamole. See also antiplatelet therapy.
protease inhibitor
1. a substance that blocks activity of endopeptidase (protease), such as in a virus.
protein C inhibitor the primary inhibitor of activated anticoagulant protein C; it is a glycoprotein of the serpin family of proteinase inhibitors and also inhibits several other proteins involved in coagulation (thrombin, kallikrein, and coagulation factors X and XI) and urokinase. Called also plasminogen activator inhibitor 3.
proton pump inhibitor gastric acid pump i.
reverse transcriptase inhibitor a substance that blocks activity of the reverse transcriptase of a retrovirus and is used as an antiretroviral agent. Some are nucleosides or nucleoside analogues, and those that are not are therefore often called non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.
selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) any of a group of drugs that inhibit the inactivation of serotonin by blocking its absorption in the central nervous system; used as antidepressants and in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder.
serine protease inhibitor (serine proteinase inhibitor) serpin.
topoisomerase i's a class of antineoplastic agents that interfere with the arrangement of DNA in cells.

cholinesterase inhibitor

an agent or medication with effects that inhibit the enzyme responsible for the reuptake of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses, thus perpetuating its action at the receptor; most notable therapeutic application is in the treatment of myasthenia gravis or after nondepolarizing neuromuscular relaxants have been administered.

cholinesterase inhibitor

cholinesterase inhibitor

Pharmacology Any agent–eg, pyridostigmine, ambenonium, neostigmine, that inhibits acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine, thereby preventing transmission of nerve impulses to a muscle

cho·lin·es·ter·ase in·hib·i·tor

(kō'lin-es'tĕr-ās in-hib'i-tŏr)
A drug, such as neostigmine, which, by inhibiting biodegradation of acetylcholine, restores myoneural function in myasthenia gravis or after nondepolarizing neuromuscular relaxants have been administered.

cholinesterase inhibitor

A drug or agent that blocks the action of CHOLINESTERASE so that acetylcholine accumulates, often dangerously. The insecticides malathion and parathion are cholinesterase inhibitors, as are the drugs physostigmine (eserine), neostigmine, edrophonium, pyridostigmine, tacrine, demecarium and ambendonium. Other cholinesterase inhibitors are the nerve gases sarin, soman and tabun. Sarin has a lethal dose in humans of less than 1 mg.

cholinesterase

an enzyme that splits acetylcholine into acetic acid and choline. Called also acetylcholinesterase.
This enzyme is present throughout the body, but is particularly important at the neuromuscular junction, where the nerve fibers terminate. Acetylcholine is released when a nerve impulse reaches a neuromuscular junction. It diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to cholinergic receptors on the muscle fibers, causing them to contract. Cholinesterase splits acetylcholine into its components, thus stopping stimulation of the muscle fibers. The end products of the metabolism of acetylcholine are taken up by nerve fibers and resynthesized into acetylcholine.

cholinesterase inhibitor
the drugs neostigmine, physostigmine and pyridostigmine inhibit cholinesterase. These drugs are used to treat myasthenia gravis, a disease in which the cholinergic receptors are attacked by autoantibodies. The drugs extend the effect of acetylcholine on the muscle fiber.
cholinesterase reactivator
choline-reactivating oximes are effective antidotes in organophosphorus insecticide poisoning, a state of acetylcholine excess because of cholinesterase inhibition. 2-PAM (2-pyridine aldoxime methchloride) is the most popular oxime for this purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a meta-analysis of studies that also involved the cholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine (Cochrane Database Syst.
The following two cases show neurocognitive deficits after different types of poisoning events by cholinesterase inhibitors (carbamates and OPs): the first case (AMF) was due to accidental ingestion of a carbamate compound, and the second (PVM) was a greenhouse worker with a history of repeated poisonings while working with OPs, carbamates, or both together.
4 million people aged 67 and older to see whether the risk for bradycardia was higher for those taking drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors.
First, we found that chlorpyrifos was more effective than chlorpyrifos oxon, despite the fact that the latter is a far more potent cholinesterase inhibitor.
People with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are prescribed Cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon and Reminyl) because they increase the level of a chemical in the brain that seems to help memory.
92,93) While these open label results are suggestive, double-blind studies are necessary before concluding that one cholinesterase inhibitor is superior to another.
In the immediate feedback group, cholinesterase inhibitor use increased in amyloid positive subjects and decreased in amyloid negative subjects so that 67.
The study went on to define those drugs as memantine, cholinesterase inhibitors, and statins.
Indeed, minor structural modifications to serpentine may yield a potent and selective cholinesterase inhibitor, potentially useful for pharmacological management of Alzheimer's disease and/or myasthenia gravis, thus highlighting the interest of C.
Most of us when we diagnose Parkinson's disease dementia would reach for a cholinesterase inhibitor if patients are symptomatic," Dr.
AD Razadyne[R] (galantamine, formerly Cholinesterase inhibitor known as Reminyl[R]) prescribed to treat symptoms Prevents the breakdown of of mild to moderate AD acetylcholine and stimulates nicotinic receptors to release more acetylcholine in the brain.
There is some evidence that certain patients may benefit from higher doses of the cholinesterase inhibitor medications.