choline esters


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choline esters

a group of cholinergic drugs that act at sites or organs where acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter. Examples include bethanechol, carbachol, and methacholine.

choline

a quaternary amine which occurs in the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. It was formerly considered to be a B-vitamin and was used to treat fatty degeneration of the liver.

choline acetylase, choline acetyltransferase
an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline esters
choline has some of the activity of a cholineric drug but the effect is multiplied many times over by combining it with an acid, e.g. acetic acid, to form an ester, e.g. acetylcholine. Other choline esters with important pharmacological activity are carbachol, bethanechol, methacholine.
choline nutritional deficiency
requirements for choline are largely dependent on the amount of methionine in the diet. In dogs and cats, under normal circumstances, deficiency is unlikely, but choline is a dietary essential for pigs and young calves. Incoordination, weakness, dyspnea and hock swelling occur in experimental deficiency, but there is little evidence of naturally occurring disease. Poultry fed diets deficient in choline develop perosis.
choline salicylate
the choline salt of salicylic acid, which has analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties.
choline theophyllinate
a theophylline derivative used as a bronchodilator. Called also oxtriphylline.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacologically active choline esters in marine gastropods, Ann.
More recently toxins and narcotizing agents have been described from the hypobranchial gland such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), murexine (urocanylcholine), choline ester and biogenic amines (Erspamer 1946, 1952; Erspamer & Benati 1953, Whittaker 1960, Malaszkiewicz 1967, Huang & Mir 1971, Andrews et al.
Such in vitro formation of choline may account for the higher choline concentrations in serum than in plasma (Table 3) and could be explained by enzymatic cleavage of choline esters.

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