choline


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to choline: choline bitartrate, Choline chloride, choline salicylate

choline

 [ko´lēn]
an amine that occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. Choline is a lipotropic agent, a substance that decreases liver fat content by increasing phospholipid turnover. It was formerly considered to be a B vitamin and is now classified as a pseudovitamin, although it is still sometimes classified as part of the vitamin B complex. Vitamin B12 and folacin are involved in the synthesis of choline.
choline acetylase (choline acetyltransferase) an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline magnesium trisalicylate see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate see salicylate.

cho·line

(kō'lēn),
agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), acetate (acetylcholine), or cytidine diphosphate (cytidine diphosphocholine). It is included in the vitamin B complex. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.

choline

/cho·line/ (ko´lēn) a quaternary amine, often classified as a member of the B vitamin complex; it occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism, and prevents the deposition of fat in the liver.
choline magnesium trisalicylate  see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate  see salicylate.

choline

(kō′lēn′)
n.
A natural amine, C5H15NO2, often classed in the vitamin B complex, that is a constituent of lecithin and other phospholipids and is a precursor of certain biologically important molecules, such as acetylcholine.

choline

[kō′lēn]
Etymology: Gk, chole, bile
a lipotropic substance that can be synthesized by the body. Under certain circumstances it is considered by some to be essential. Found in most animal tissues, choline is a primary component of acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter, and functions with inositol as a basic constituent of lecithin. It prevents fat deposits in the liver and facilitates the movement of fats into the cells. The richest sources of choline are liver, kidneys, brains, wheat germ, brewer's yeast, and egg yolk. See also inositol, lecithin.

choline

A chemical present in most tissues, either free or combined with acetate (acetylcholine, which is critical for synaptic transmission), cytidine diphosphate or lecithin (phosphatidylcholine); it is included in the vitamin B complex.

Alternative medicine
Some providers of alternative healthcare have recommended choline to manage body odour, convulsions and tardive dyskinesia.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
An amine found in most animal tissues. It is included in the vitamin B complex; as acetylcholine, it is essential for synaptic transmission. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.

choline

One of the B vitamins necessary for the metabolism of fats and the protection of the liver against fatty deposition. The important NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine is formed from it.

choline

an organic base which is a constituent of ACETYLCHOLINE.

choline

is promoted as an ergogenic aid to increase strength and/or decrease fat. No valid studies have confirmed these effects. See also ergogenic aids; appendix 4.4 .

choline,

n a compound that is used by the body to synthesize acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter), lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), and platelet-activating factor (a blood clotting agent). Choline can be obtained from dietary sources as a supplement and is also synthesized by the body. Has been used for nerve conditions, kidney conditions, liver conditions, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Taking regular doses of more than 3.5 g per day can produce a fishy odor, low blood pressure, diarrhea, dizziness, and changes in the ECG. See also lecithin.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
Agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin, acetate, or cytidine diphosphate; included in vitamin B complex.

choline,

n a nutrient essential for cardiovascular and brain function and for cellular membrane composition and repair. Classified as an essential nutrient by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine (USA). Adequate intakes (AI) have been established.
choline salicylate,
n brand name: Arthropan;
drug class: salicylate analgesic;
action: inhibits prostaglandin synthesis by interfering with cyclooxygenase need for biosynthesis;
uses: relief of mild to moderate pain from fever, arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

choline

a quaternary amine which occurs in the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. It was formerly considered to be a B-vitamin and was used to treat fatty degeneration of the liver.

choline acetylase, choline acetyltransferase
an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline esters
choline has some of the activity of a cholineric drug but the effect is multiplied many times over by combining it with an acid, e.g. acetic acid, to form an ester, e.g. acetylcholine. Other choline esters with important pharmacological activity are carbachol, bethanechol, methacholine.
choline nutritional deficiency
requirements for choline are largely dependent on the amount of methionine in the diet. In dogs and cats, under normal circumstances, deficiency is unlikely, but choline is a dietary essential for pigs and young calves. Incoordination, weakness, dyspnea and hock swelling occur in experimental deficiency, but there is little evidence of naturally occurring disease. Poultry fed diets deficient in choline develop perosis.
choline salicylate
the choline salt of salicylic acid, which has analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties.
choline theophyllinate
a theophylline derivative used as a bronchodilator. Called also oxtriphylline.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1998, the Institute of Medicine (the public health arm of the National Academy of Sciences) recognized choline as an essential nutrient.
5 Survey on Dosage Forms of Polyene Phosphatidyl Choline in China, 2010-2014
Methionine, as one of the sulfur amino acids, is a wellknown nutritional factor that influences choline requirement.
Research has shown choline to be essential for liver function and to prevent fatty liver, and is critical for fetal development of the eye and brain.
An article published in The FASEB Journal presents University of North Carolina researchers' findings of a variance in the requirement for choline among people of different genders and ethnic backgrounds.
Thus, the scientists concluded that prenatal choline intake improves long-term memory in the resulting offspring once they reach adulthood.
The team's latest paper in Chemical Communications describes the creation of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl choline phosphate (MCP) and its successful polymerization into poly(MCP).
While we can find no evidence in the medical literature for the use of choline to address cardiac dysrhythmias, we can establish that the biochemical action of ACh exerts control over the cardiac rate and depolarization.
Jacob and colleagues conducted the folate and choline investigations in separate studies with 11 men, aged 33 to 46, and 10 postmenopausal women, aged 49 to 63, as volunteers.
Previous research has shown that choline deficiency causes fatty liver and other liver damage.
To answer these questions, we evaluated PC12 cells in the undifferentiated state (CPF without NGF), at the initiation of differentiation (inclusion of CPF simultaneously with the addition of NGF), and at mid-differentiation (CPF added after several days of NGF pretreatment), evaluating cell viability, DNA synthesis associated with cell replication, and enzymatic markers that characterize the cholinergic or catecholaminergic phenotype: choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), respectively.
Whole-blood choline (WBCHO) and plasma choline (PLCHO) have been reported to be predictive for cardiac events in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (1,2).