chloroquine


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Related to chloroquine: hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine phosphate

chloroquine

 [klor´o-kwin]
1. an antimalarial and antiprotozoal agent, also used as a lupus erythematosus suppressant.
2. an antiamebic and antiinflammatory agent used in treatment of malaria, giardiasis, non-intestinal amebiasis, lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis; used as the base, hydrochloride salt, or phosphate salt.

chlor·o·quine

(klōr'ō-kwīn),
An antimalarial agent used for the treatment and suppression of Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, and P. falciparum; available in phosphate and sulfate forms. It does not produce a radical cure because it has no effect on the exoerythrocytic stages; chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum have developed in Southeast Asia, Africa, and South America. It is also used for hepatic amebiasis and for certain skin diseases, for example, lupus erythematosus and lichen planus.

chloroquine

/chlo·ro·quine/ (klor´o-kwin) an antiamebic and anti-inflammatory used in the treatment of malaria, giardiasis, extraintestinal amebiasis, lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis; used also as the hydrochloride and phosphate salts.

chloroquine

(klôr′ə-kwīn′, -kwēn′)
n.
A drug, C18H26ClN3, used usually in its phosphate form to prevent and treat malaria and to treat amebiasis that has spread outside the intestines.

chloroquine

[klôr′əkwīn′]
an antimalarial.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of malaria, extraintestinal amebiasis, rheumatoid arthritis, discoid lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, pemphigus, and photoallergic reactions.
contraindications Retinal or visual field changes, porphyria, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse reactions are GI disturbances, headache, visual disturbances resulting from retinal damage, and pruritus. It can turn the skin blue/black and/or the urine brown/black, bleach the hair, and cause photosensitivity.

chlor·o·quine

(klōr'ō-kwīn)
An antimalarial agent used for the treatment and suppression ofPlasmodium vivax, P. malariae, and P. falciparum; available in phosphate and sulfate forms. It is also used for hepatic amebiasis and for certain skin diseases, e.g., lupus erythematosus and lichen planus.

chloroquine

A drug used in the treatment of MALARIA, RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS and lupus erythematosus. In 1993 the clinical effectiveness of chloroquine in Malawi was less than 50 percent and it was replaced by sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine. But ten years late the efficiency had risen again to 99 percent. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Avoclor and Nivaquine.

Chloroquine

An antimalarial drug that was first used in the 1940s, until the first evidence of quinine resistance appeared in the 1960s. It is now ineffective against falciparum malaria almost everywhere. However, because it is inexpensive, it is still the antimalarial drug most widely used in Africa. Native individuals with partial immunity may have better results with chloroquine than a traveler with no previous exposure.
Mentioned in: Malaria

chloroquine

antimalarial drug used to treat recalcitrant rheumatoid arthritis and mild systemic lupus erythematosus (note: contraindicated in psoriatic arthropathy)

chlor·o·quine

(klōr'ō-kwīn)
An antimalarial agent used for the treatment and suppression of Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, and P. falciparum; also used for hepatic amebiasis and some skin diseases.

chloroquine

an antiprotozoal agent, used in the treatment of avian malaria, anaplasmosis and theileriosis in cattle and amebiasis in non-human primates.

chloroquine poisoning
the drug has an affinity for melanin and ocular tissues with melanin; causes a drug-induced retinopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
After a 1-h incubation, the inoculum was removed and replaced with media (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 2% fetal bovine serum, Penn/Strep, L-glutamine) containing chloroquine (Sigma, St.
Chloroquine has to be present in the bloodstream for a prolonged period and at a relatively high dose for there to be a significant risk of developing retinopathy.
Recommendations on screening for chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine retinopathy: a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.
This means malaria could once again be treated with chloroquine if it is administered twice-daily, rather than just once a day," the researcher said.
The in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant and chloroquine sensitive strains ofP.
The comeback of chloroquine is bound to give promising results as it would not just help in protecting the currently used medicines but also in delaying the reappearance of resistance.
Groups II, III and 1V were given chloroquine (970mg/kg body weight) and G.
Studies have shown that chloroquine affects a wide range of biochemical processes including inhibition of key metabolic enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (18,19).
Numerous toxic effects, such as skin disorders, blood dyscrasias, corneal deposits, encephalopathy, neuropathy, myopathy and impairment of auditory function are associated with prolonged high-dose use of chloroquine (2,3).
In one study [6], efficacy of chloroquine in treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria was investigated using standard World Health Organization (WHO) procedures in three distinct epidemiological settings.
Eric Xu, Head of the VARI Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, and his colleagues showed that chloroquine represses inflammation through synergistic activation of glucocorticoid signaling.
Both chloroquine and cowhage, however, cause a histamine-independent itch, as do opium compounds; inflammation, from asthma and allergies to skin rash; and eczema.