chlordane


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hydrocarbon

 [hi″dro-kahr´bon]
an organic compound that contains carbon and hydrogen only.
alicyclic hydrocarbon one that has cyclic structure and aliphatic properties.
aliphatic hydrocarbon one in which no carbon atoms are joined to form a ring.
aromatic hydrocarbon one that has cyclic structure and a closed conjugated system of double bonds.
chlorinated hydrocarbon any hydrocarbon compound with chlorine substitutions; many are toxic. They are used mainly as refrigerants, industrial solvents, dry cleaning fluids, and insecticides (such as ddt and dieldrin). Some have been used as anesthetics, such as chloroform.

chlor·dane

(klōr'dān),
A chlorinated hydrocarbon used as an insecticide; it may be absorbed through the skin with resultant severe toxic effects: hyperexcitability of central nervous system, tremors, lack of muscular coordination, convulsions, and death; also causes damage to the liver, kidneys, and spleen. It is only mildly toxic to animals.

chlordane

/chlor·dane/ (klor´dān) a poisonous substance of the chlorinated hydrocarbon group, used as an insecticide.

chlordane

(klôr′dān′) also

chlordan

(-dăn′)
n.
A colorless, odorless, viscous liquid, C10H6Cl8, formerly used as an insecticide. It may be toxic to humans and wildlife as a result of its effect on the nervous system.
A viscous, chlorinated organic compound once used as an insecticide and fumigant, now limited by the EPA to control termites and non-food plants; it is absorbed through the skin, causes liver and kidney damage, and possibly cancer

chlordane

Toxicology A viscous, chlorinated organic compound once used as an insecticide and fumigant, now EPA-limited to control termites and non-food plants; it is absorbed through the skin, causes liver and kidney damage, possibly CA Clinical Convulsions, depression, hyperexcitability, incoordination, death

chlordane

References in periodicals archive ?
Since the 1970s, growing awareness of the dangers of pesticides has led more than 90 nations to ban the domestic use of various compounds, particularly harmful pesticides such as DDT, endrin, and chlordane.
firms are allowed to manufacture more than 4,000,000 tons of chlordane and other pesticides.
In 1988, concerns over the chemical's risk to both the environment and human health led to the loss of chlordane, exacerbating the Formosan termite problem.
They include aldrin/dieldrin, benzo(a)pyrene, chlordane, DDT, hexachlorobenzene, alkyl-lead, mercury, mirex, octachlorostyrene, PCBs, dioxins and furans.
The Convention's list includes the following hazardous pesticides: 2,4,5- T, aldrin, binapacryl, captafol, chlordane, chlordimeform, chlorobenzilate, DDT, DNOC and its salts, ethylene dichloride, ethylene oxide 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB), dieldrin, dinoseb, fluoroacetamide, HCH, heptachlor, hexachlorobenzene, lindane, mercury compounds, monocrotophos, parathion, pentachlorophenol and toxaphene, plus certain formulations of methamidophos, methyl-parathion, and phosphamidon, as well as dustable-powder formulations containing a combination of benomyl at or above 7 per cent, carbofuran at or above 10 per cent and thiram at or above 15 per cent.
Among the men's mothers, however, relatively high blood concentrations of all PCBs, HCB, cis-nonachlordane, and one other chlordane were linked to sons' cases of testicular cancer, Hardell and his colleagues report in an upcoming issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.
The same kind of global double standard has persisted with other chemicals known to be hazardous, including PCBs and chlordane.
The need for an effective biological control for white grubs was intensified in 1969 by the removal of the chemical chlordane from the market.
Every man's semen swims with 35 different kinds of PCBs, plus ethers and phenols, and every woman's breast milk boasts a Frankensteinian brew of the pesticides chlordane, dieldrin, lindane and mirex, mixed with some 65 isomers of PCBs and dioxins.
The purpose of the advisories is to warn people about potential chlordane contamination and to suggest that people do not consume fish or consume only limited quantifies of fish taken from areas containing chlordane-contaminated fish.
For 2006, a do-not-eat advisory for white bass due to chlordane has been lifted for the Cheat Lake River from the Cheat Lake Dam to its mouth, and for the Monongahela River from Point Marion to Grays Landing Lock and Dam in Fayette and Greene counties.
Like many organic molecules, each chlordane compound comes in two mirrorimage variants called enantiomers, which may break down at different rates in the environment.