chill

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chill

 [chil]
a sensation of cold, with convulsive shaking of the body. A true chill, or rigor, results from an increase in chemical activity within the body and usually ushers in a considerable rise in body temperature. The pallor and coldness of a chill, and the piloerection of the skin (goose flesh) that often accompanies it, are caused by constriction of the peripheral blood vessels. Chills are symptomatic of a wide variety of diseases. They usually do not accompany well-localized infections.
Patient Care. During a chill sufficient heat should be applied to maintain normal body temperature. Since the patient will most likely begin to have a sharp rise in body temperature immediately after or during the chill, it is best to use only a light blanket to alleviate the sensation of cold. In addition to this the patient's temperature should be taken every 30 minutes until it is stabilized.

chill

(chĭl), Avoid the redundant phrase cold chill(s).
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering or shaking and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a symptom of an infectious disease due to the invasion of the blood by toxins. Synonym(s): rigor (2)
[A.S. cele, cold]

chill

(chil) a sensation of cold, with convulsive shaking of the body.

chill

(chĭl)
n.
1. A moderate but penetrating coldness.
2. A sensation of coldness, often accompanied by shivering and pallor of the skin.
v. chilled, chilling, chills
v.tr.
1. To affect with or as if with cold.
2. To lower in temperature; cool.

chill′ing·ly adv.
chill′ness n.

chill

Etymology: AS, cele
1 the sensation of cold caused by exposure to a cold environment.
2 an attack of shivering with pallor and a feeling of coldness, often occurring at the beginning of an infection and accompanied by a rapid rise in temperature.

chill

Clinical medicine 1. A sensation of coldness often accompanied by shivering, chattering of teeth, goosebumps–gooseflesh, and skin pallor, which may follow exposure to a cold, damp environment, or precede or occur at the same time as a cold; chills are a response to an abrupt disparity between the set point of the hypothalamic thermostat and the blood temperature

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]

chill

A sudden short fever causing shivering (rigor) and a feeling of coldness. This may be caused by any acute infection.

chill

(chil)
A feeling of cold with shivering or shaking and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a symptom of an infectious disease.
[A.S. cele, cold]

chill

References in classic literature ?
Introduced as Charles, he transferred his scowl and wrath to Tarwater, who, genially oblivious, devoted himself to the fire, took advantage of the chill morning breeze to create a draught which the other had left stupidly blocked by stones, and soon developed less smoke and more flame.
The growls of the ape-man sent cold chills up the warrior's spine, causing him to go carefully lest he miss at the first cast and lay himself open to an attack from those merciless teeth and mighty hands.
Your cold and sullen temper, which chills every breast about you, which turns affection into fear, and changes duty into dread, has forced us on this secret course, repugnant to our nature and our wish, and far more foreign, sir, to us than you.
the blood chills at my heart as I write it down--that form is HERS; the face is very pale, and the eyes are glassy bright; but I know them well.
Linton and his daughter would frequently walk out among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves they stayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp, my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs, and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearly without intermission.
He was not himself aware, nor was any one else, how he had caught the chill.
Involuntarily I looked round me, as I was accustomed to look round me when I went home; for, these mysterious words gave me a chill.
He stood and listened, and gazed for a long while--there was really something on the road coming towards him then, but he caught no sign of it; and the stillness and the wide trackless snow seemed to narrow his solitude, and touched his yearning with the chill of despair.
In fact, a chill tremor went through me as I realised that, to all intent, I was at length respectably settled down, with quite a considerable retrospect of happy married life.
It was still quite early, and the coldest morning that I think I ever was abroad in--a chill that pierced into the marrow.
But his master was not there; he was staying, it appeared, at the house in Murrayfield; and though the butler would have been glad enough to have taken his place and given all the news of the family, John, struck with a little chill, was eager to be gone.
Shrubs are gone, Withered the grass; all chill as the white rime Of early morn.