chilly

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chilly

(chĭl′ē)
adj. chill·ier, chill·iest
1. Cool or cold enough to cause discomfort.
2. Feeling cold, often to the point of shivering.

chill′i·ly adv.
chill′i·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
All four had noticed that most of their patients complained of an "overwhelming chilliness.
Murray will also have to work out the conditions, which have ranged from customary heat to unseasonal chilliness.
f) Questionnaire-based information: self-reported long-lasting exposure at workplace to heat, chilliness, or wetness.
The study, carried out at Cardiff University's Common Cold Centre, found that "a simple hot drink can provide an immediate and sustained relief from symptoms of runny nose, cough, sneezing, sore throat, chilliness and tiredness.
The researchers found that "a simple hot drink of fruit cordial can provide immediate and sustained relief from symptoms of runny nose, cough, sneezing, sore throat, chilliness and tiredness".
It also had immediate effects on symptoms such as tiredness, chilliness and cough and within 15 minutes it had beneficial effects on symptoms of runny noses and sneezing.
Martin brings a Thom Yorke-like chilliness to clunky lyrics about the dead not being dead but rather having taken up residence in his noggin on the disembodied spirits ditty "42.
The society woman is seized "by a creepy chilliness," generated by "disappointment, anger, dismay and various other disagreeable sensations" (371).
Syed Hamid mentioned the chilliness between Japan and China in the course of discussing efforts to create a cohesive regional community, saying that bilateral tensions are hurting the attempt, the official said.
This wonderfully gnomic remark, whose degree of seriousness is impossible to determine, points up the recurring tension, in Enright, between commitment and detachment, participation and observation, warmth and chilliness.
Some of this chilliness is borne out in Carol Kyros Walker's book which provides contemporary photographs of the route the Wordsworths (William and Dorothy) travelled with Samuel Taylor Coleridge when they made an excursion to Scotland in 1803.
Salle's painting has certainly lost its early bravura nerviness; given the critical apparatus that surrounded it two decades ago, as well as its attitudinal chilliness and the particular cerebral quality of its macho swagger, we might forget the jazziness of its juxtapositions, with its plaids and patterns, its cartoon figures, and its combinations of photographic passages and loose drawing.