child

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child

 [chīld]
the human young, from infancy to puberty.
child abuse the nonaccidental use of physical force or the nonaccidental act of omission by a parent or other custodian responsible for the care of a child. Child abuse encompasses malnutrition and other kinds of neglect through ignorance as well as deliberate withholding from the child of the necessary and basic physical care, including the medical and dental care necessary for the child to grow up without threat to his or her physical and emotional survival. Examples of physical abuse range from burns and exposure to extreme cold to beating, poisoning, strangulation, and withholding of food and water. Members of the health care team should be alert for signs of child abuse and aware of the proper procedure for reporting suspected cases to local authorities.

Abusive parents come from all socioeconomic groups. Many have themselves been abused as children. They typically lack parenting skills and do not understand the normal developmental stages through which children progress and demand performance from their children that is clearly beyond a child's capability. Some engage in role reversal, looking to the child for protection and loving response, while at the same time denying the child satisfaction of his or her own needs. The majority of identified abusive parents are believed to want professional help in changing their behavior.
abused child/adult in the omaha system, a client problem in the psychosocial domain, defined as a child or adult subjected to nonaccidental physical or emotional injury.
autistic child a child suffering from autistic disorder.
exceptional child a child with special learning needs; he or she may have learning disabilities, be handicapped, or be gifted.
neglected child/adult in the omaha system, a client problem in the psychosocial domain, defined as a child or adult deprived of minimally accepted standards of food, shelter, clothing, and care.

CHILD

Acronym for congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects.
Synonym(s): CHILD syndrome

child

(chīld)
n. pl. children (chĭl′drən)
1.
a. A person between birth and puberty.
b. A person who has not attained maturity or the age of legal majority.
2.
a. An unborn infant; a fetus.
b. An infant; a baby.
3. A son or daughter; an offspring.

child′less adj.
child′less·ness n.

child

Etymology: AS, cild
1 a person of either sex between the time of birth and adolescence.
2 an unborn or recently born human being; fetus; neonate; infant.
3 an offspring or descendant; a son or daughter or a member of a particular tribe or clan.
4 one who is like a child or immature.
Legal definition A person who has not attained the legal age for consent to treatment or procedures involved in research, as determined under the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the research will be conducted

child

A person who has not attained the legal age for consent to treatment or procedures involved in the research, as determined under the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the research will be conducted Medtalk Pediatric patient. See Adopted-in child, Adopted-away child, Battered child, Chosen child, FLK, Latchkey child, Puppet child, Wednesday's child, The Wild Child.

child,

n 1. a person of either gender between the time of birth and adolescence, or puberty.
2. in the law of negligence and in laws for the protection of children, a term used as the opposite of
adult (generally under the age of puberty) without reference to parentage and distinction of gender.
child abuse,
n the physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment of a person under 18 years of age. Child abuse occurs predominantly with children under 3 years of age. Symptoms include bruises and contusions, medical record of repeated trauma, radiographic evidence of fractures, emotional distress, and failure to thrive.
child neglect,
n a form of child abuse in which proper care is denied or withheld.

Patient discussion about child

Q. Could be – Arthritis in children?!? My son started to show symptoms similar to arthritis. But I know it’s a common disease in the elderly population. Could be arthritis in children?

A. You baffled me, I never thought about this idea before…children’s arthritis. So I looked up for information in the best site I know for pediatric care and here is what I found:
http://www.drmdk.com/html/ped_rheumatology.html

Q. Can cancer occur in young children? I heard that cancer happens more often as you get older. Can it happen to kids as well?

A. Cancer can happen in children, but the age of peak incidence of cancer in children occurs during the first year of life, in infants. The average annual incidence in the United States, 1975-1995, was 233 per million infants. Several estimates of incidence exist. In the U.S: Neuroblastoma comprised 28% of infant cancer cases and was the most common malignancy among these young children. The leukemias as a group represented the next most common type of cancer, comprising 17% of all cases.

Q. Is it ok not to want children? I am 33, and I know my bio clock is ticking, but I just don't want to have a child. At least not yet. Is there something wrong with me?

A. I agree with fatman, that's totally your decision.
If you feel that you're not ready yet, better to wait until you're more ready for that. Because having children is another big responsibility, and you will feel guilty if -for the sake of your age- you push yourself to have child, then morally you are not welcoming that child.

More discussions about child
References in classic literature ?
Vera was a handsome girl of twenty; Sonya a girl of sixteen with all the charm of an opening flower; Natasha, half grown up and half child, was now childishly amusing, now girlishly enchanting.
He let his hand fall, and for the first time in her life Mary saw old Peter Featherstone begin to cry childishly.
A child was brought up at his good mother's side an hundred years, an utter simpleton, playing childishly in his own home.
Side by side, again, with war and love, appears in the romances medieval religion, likewise conventionalized and childishly superstitious, but in some inadequate degree a mitigator of cruelty and a restrainer of lawless passion.
He looked so childishly vexed and crest-fallen that I hastened to console him.
said Anna, and she cried as weakly and childishly as he.
Disarmed by this glimpse of a woman's nature in the spoilt child, though for an instant disposed to resent it as seeming to involve the enforced infliction of himself upon her, Edwin Drood stands watching her as she childishly cries and sobs, with both hands to the handkerchief at her eyes, and then--she becoming more composed, and indeed beginning in her young inconstancy to laugh at herself for having been so moved--leads her to a seat hard by, under the elm-trees.
From her slender figure Miss Haldin had taken her for a young girl; but if her face was almost childishly round, it was also sallow and wrinkled, with dark rings under the eyes.
and to shrink childishly, in her spoilt way, a little closer to him.
Ginola, who will be on the bench for today's Premiership battle with title challengers Arsenal, launched a devastating assault on Gregory claiming the new Derby County boss childishly ignored him and showed him no respect.
What could have been a bracing attack on everything that's wrong with our current film culture, or at least a funny spoof of directorial megalomania as a cult-building phenomenon, ends up childishly underdeveloped.
For something very disturbing appears to be happening to John "He he" Motson, the BBC's chief chuckler: the older he gets, the more childishly excitable he sounds.