baby talk

(redirected from child-directed speech)
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Related to child-directed speech: motherese

baby talk

1 the speech patterns and sounds of young children learning to talk, characterized by mispronunciation, imperfect syntax, repetition, and phonetic modifications, such as lisping or stuttering. See also lallation.
2 the intentionally oversimplified manner of speech, imitative of young children learning to talk, used by adults in addressing children or pets.
3 the speech patterns characteristic of regressive stages of various mental disorders, especially schizophrenia.
The acquisition of language skills by a baby, which occurs in 5 overlapping stages
(1) phonation—humming with the mouth closed (up to 2 months)
(2) primitive articulation—use of tongue and jaw to form new sounds (1 to 4 months)
(3) expansion—squeals, screeches, whispers, seemingly exploring the range of sounds, pitch, and amplitude—e.g., growls, ‘raspberries’ (3 to 8 months)

(4) babbling—the formation of Baby’s first syllables—da-da-da-da, ma-ma-ma-ma, etc. (5 to 10 months)

(5) sophisticated babbling—the stringing together of various syllables and meaningless sounds which have the rhythm and pacing of real sentences (9 to 18 months)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although high-frequency verbs in child-directed speech tend to be irregular, a number of regular verbs are also used with considerable frequency by mothers when speaking to their young children; exposure is such that difficulties in the perception of the unstressed -ed suffix can be overridden.
If double-object applicative constructions are frequent in everyday discourse, or at least in child-directed speech, we would expect such constructions to be learned easily and early.
The syntactic frames (number and percent) of objects in ditransitive applicative constructions in the spontaneous speech of two children (sampled at 2;1 years, 2;6 years, and 3/3;2 years) and in adult child-directed speech (Ben- V TH = preverbal pronominal benefactive and postverbal lexical theme NP, etc.