chief cell


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chief cell

the predominant cell type of a gland.

chief cell

Etymology: Fr, chef; L, cella, storeroom
1 also called zymogenic cell. Any one of the columnar epithelial cells or the cuboidal epithelial cells that line the gastric glands and secrete pepsinogen and intrinsic factor, which are needed for the digestion and absorption of vitamin B12 and the normal development of red blood cells. Pernicious anemia may be caused by the absence of intrinsic factor.
2 any one of the epithelioid cells with pale-staining cytoplasm and a large nucleus containing a prominent nucleolus. Cords of such cells form the main substance of the pineal body.
3 also called principal cell. Any one of the polyhedral epithelial cells, within the parathyroid glands, which contain pale, clear cytoplasm and a vesicular nucleus.

chief cell

(chēf sel)
The predominant cell type of a gland.

chief cell

1. Any of the cells of the parathyroid gland that secretes the parathyroid hormone.
2. Any of the cells of the gastric glands that secretes pepsinogen.
See also: cell
References in periodicals archive ?
Photomicrograph showing chief cells, which are focally and weakly immunoreactive for chromogranin (original magnification X20).
1996) (28) reported that the oxyphil cells are the result of proliferation of mitochondria in the chief cells.
C, Multiphoton microscopy reveals individual gastric oxyntic glands that are separated by a mesh of collagen fibers at the deeper part of the mucosal layer ([greater than or equal to] 60 m depth) D, The corresponding light-microscopic image shows there are chief cells and parietal cells in each gastric gland (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnifications x400 [B and D]).
Citation: "Differentiated Troy+ chief cells act as 'reserve' stem cells to generate all lineages of the stomach epithelium"; Stange DE et al.
Chromogranins are proteins within the chief cells, and S-100 is produced by sustentacular cells (SY38 is another, less specific, marker for neuroendocrine tumors).
Histologically, the cells resemble chief cells and are uniform, with clear to amphophilic cytoplasm surrounding small, hyperchromatic nuclei (figure, B).
The thymic tissue appeared as a single lobule divided by fine, fibrous septa, and the parathyroid tissue was made up entirely of chief cells.
The chief cells are strongly and diffusely immunoreactive with chromogranin and synaptophysin, while the supporting sustentacular cells react with S-100 protein (figure 2).
Microscopically, the glands are nodular, and examination will identify an increase in parenchymal-cell mass, composed of chief cells and/or oxyphilic cells (figure).
The hypercellular gland was predominantly made up of chief cells and a small number of clear and oncocytic cells.