chemotherapy-induced emesis


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chemotherapy-induced emesis

An adverse effect of many chemotherapeutics, which is usually self-limited and rarely life-threatening.
 
Highly emetogenic
Cisplatin, carmustine, dacarbazine, dactinomycin, mechlorethamine (nitrogen mustard), streptozocin.
 
Moderately emetogenic
Azacitidine, arparginase, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, mitomycin.
 
Management
Dopamine (D2 high-dose metoclopramide), serotonin (5-HT3 receptor antagonists—e.g., ondansetron),

chemotherapy-induced emesis

Chemotherapy-induced nausea & vomiting Oncology A side effect of many chemotherapeutic agents which, while often the most anxiety-provoking of the toxic effects of chemotherapy, is self-limited and rarely life-threatening Highly emetogenic Cisplatin, carmustine, dacarbazine, dactinomycin, mechlorethamine–nitrogen mustard, streptozocin Management Dopamine D2 high-dose metoclopramide, serotonin–5-HT3 receptor antagonists–eg, ondansetron. See Ondansetron.

chemotherapy-induced emesis

Vomiting associated with or caused by drug treatments for cancer. Even though this side effect is usually self-limiting and seldom life-threatening, the prospect of it may produce anxiety and depression in many patients. Treatments may include drugs such as dronabinol, granisetron, lorazepam, prochlorperazine, and steroids, among others.
See also: emesis
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to Zantac(R), Zeiger's division was responsible for the launch of Imitrex(R), a treatment for migraine headaches, and Zofran(R), a drug to treat chemotherapy-induced emesis and post-operative nausea.
Initial emesis research focused on chemotherapy-induced emesis caused by
Creative, cutting-edge CNS research by MRL scientists has already resulted in drug candidates for depression and chemotherapy-induced emesis (vomiting) now in late-stage clinical trials.

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