chemotherapeutic


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che·mo·ther·a·peu·tic

(kē'mō-thār-ă-pyū'tik),
Relating to chemotherapy.

chemotherapeutic

adjective Referring to a chemotherapeutic agent, effect or regimen noun Chemotherapeutic agent, see there.

che·mo·ther·a·peu·tic

(kē'mō-thār-ă-pyū'tik)
Relating to chemotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the major causes of this disease recurrence is the leukemia cells hiding in the bone marrow are less susceptible or resistant to chemotherapeutic agent due to its protective environment.
She asserted that even though the topic is still controversial, our study indicated that taking antioxidant supplements on the same day as chemotherapeutic drugs may negate the effect of those drugs.
Also, the Bcl-w and E2F6 stable expressing WPE-1 NA22 cell lines showed high resistance to various chemotherapeutic drugs.
Three local chemotherapeutic agents have been reviewed: Atridox[TM], a doxycycline gel, PerioChip[R], a chlorhexidine chip and Arestin[TM], a minocycline microspheres.
Many chemotherapeutic agents are specifically designed to stop rapid cell proliferation; therefore, it is reasonable to predict that cancer drugs would harm a developing fetus," Ms.
The patient was administered the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for remission induction of AML.
Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that historically been resistant to current standard chemotherapeutic approaches making it a difficult cancer to treat.
The inventors also discovered that any one of a variety of structurally dissimilar chemotherapeutic drugs can be packaged effectively into intact minicells.
Remarkably, the research team discovered that when expressed in cancer cells, this active mutant form of Chk1 permanently stopped cancer cell proliferation and caused cell death in petri dishes even without the addition of any chemotherapeutic drugs.
Several of these genes endow tumor cells with greater resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, while others are oncogenes, mutated genes that encourage a cell's proliferation or growth.
Researchers at UCLA's California NanoSystems Institute and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center also showed that MSNs accumulate almost exclusively in tumors after administration and that the nanoparticles are excreted from the body after they have delivered their chemotherapeutic drugs.
Because almost all the chemotherapeutic drugs kill through very similar mechanisms to hypoxia, we may need to totally change the type of drugs we use," says Lowe.