chemosynthesis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chemosynthesis

 [ke″mo-sin´thĕ-sis]
the building up of chemical compounds under the influence of chemical stimulation, specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water as a result of energy derived from chemical reactions. adj., adj chemosynthet´ic.

che·mo·syn·the·sis

(kē'mō-sin'thĕ-sis),
1. Chemical synthesis.
2. Chemolithotrophy.

chemosynthesis

/che·mo·syn·the·sis/ (-sin´thĕ-sis) the building up of chemical compounds under the influence of chemical stimulation, specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water as a result of energy derived from chemical reactions.chemosynthet´ic

chemosynthesis

(kē′mō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs, kĕm′ō-)
n.
The synthesis of organic compounds by certain bacteria, especially in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, using energy obtained from the chemical oxidation of simple inorganic compounds. Chemosynthesis is thought to have been used by the first forms of life on Earth.

che′mo·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
che′mo·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

chemosynthesis

the process of obtaining energy and synthesizing organic compounds from simple inorganic reactions. This is brought about by special methods of respiration involving the oxidation of inorganic compounds such as iron, ammonia and hydrogen sulphate, and is carried out by several kinds of CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC bacteria. See AUTOTROPH, NITROGEN CYCLE.

chemosynthesis

the building up of chemical compounds under the influence of chemical stimulation, specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water as a result of energy derived from chemical reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
And it will guide our search for life on other planetary bodies, where chemosynthesis may reign.
To survive, they may have absorbed nutrients from seawater or harbored symbiotic microbes that provided nourishment through photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.
According to Boggess, "It is so dark that vegetation grows by chemosynthesis, not photosynthesis.
KEY WORDS: shrimp, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, hydrothermal vents, deep-sea, symbiosis, biomineralization, chemosynthesis, microorganisms, extreme environments
These were, and still are, the only ecosystems known to be based on chemosynthesis rather than photosynthesis.
While almost all biological communities on Earth derive their primary energy from sunlight through photosynthesis, oceanic vent communities rely on a process called chemosynthesis, drawing their basic energy from chemical nutrients in the warm fluids.
On past JASON Projects, students discovered ancient Roman trading ships on the Mediterranean Sea floor; explored warships from the War of 1812 at the bottom of Lake Ontario; followed Charles Darwin's steps in the Galapagos Islands; observed migrating whales and the phenomenon of chemosynthesis in the Sea of Cortez off Mexico's Baja Peninsula; excavated ancient Mayan cities and explored the rain forests and coral reefs of Belize; visited the world's most active volcano, Hawaii's Mt.
2000), this could suggest that carbon from digested symbionts fuels the symbiosis under any suboptimal conditions that prevent chemosynthesis.
An example of the interdependence of the various oceanographic disciplines is illustrated by chemosynthesis at hot brine vents on the deep ocean floor, discovered about 1975.
This process, called chemosynthesis, enables the communities to live with little or none of the sunlight required for phtosynthesis.