chemosensitive

chemosensitive

 [ke″mo-sen´sĭ-tiv]
sensitive to changes in chemical composition.

che·mo·sen·si·tive

(kē'mō-sen'si-tiv),
Capable of perceiving changes in the chemical composition of the environment, for example, changes in the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of the blood.

chemosensitive

/che·mo·sen·si·tive/ (-sen´sĭ-tiv) sensitive to changes in chemical composition.

che·mo·sen·si·tive

(kē'mō-sen'si-tiv)
Capable of perceiving changes in the chemical composition of the environment.

chemosensitive

sensitive to changes in chemical composition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although considered one of the most chemosensitive solid tumors it becomes refractory to cytotoxic drugs and is often incurable (Abuhammad and Zihlif 2012).
Generally, advanced ovarian cancer is a comparatively chemosensitive tumor with overall clinical response rates of 70%-80% (8).
Despite this being a small case series, three distinct subgroups were recognised: surgically-treatable conditions, chemosensitive tumours and non-chemoresponsive tumours.
47) Oxygen chemosensitive sites are distributed throughout the brainstem from the thalamus to the medulla and may form an oxygen-sensitive network.
Individuals use this in conjunction with cephalic tentacles and a chemosensitive foot to detect chemical cues indicative of suitable foraging areas, and to find prey (Hughes 1986).
The Sertoli and germ cells are more chemosensitive than the Leydig cells; a patient with normal testosterone production may therefore have azoospermia.
There are some suggestions that these tumors are less chemosensitive than pure SCLC, (43,44) but other studies (45) find no difference in prognosis of combined and pure SCLC.
Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (APBSCT) in the totally outpatient setting for poor risk patients with chemosensitive malignancies.
In addition, the ventral medullary arcuate nucleus degenerates in MSA with severe depletion of putative chemosensitive glutamatergic and serotonergic neurons in the ArcN of the ventral medullary surface in MSA (93,95,96).
Lastly, we used an electrolytically-sharpened tungsten electrode to make extracellular recordings of chemosensitive neurons within individual sensilla (Gaffin & Brownell 1997b).
29) Finally, because oxygen and carbon dioxide are very important for the function of the human organism, numerous chemosensitive neurons can either obstruct or facilitate openings for stimulations, depending on the varying conditions.