chemoreflex

che·mo·re·flex

(kē'mō-rē'fleks),
A reflex initiated by the stimulation of chemoreceptors, for example, of a carotid body.

chemoreflex

[-rē′fleks]
any reflex initiated by the stimulation of chemical receptors, such as those of the carotid and aortic bodies, which respond to changes in carbon dioxide, hydrogen ion, and oxygen concentrations in the blood. See also chemoreceptor.

chemoreflex

(ke?mo-re'fleks) [? + L. reflectere, to bend back]
Any involuntary response initiated by a chemical stimulus. Synonym: chemical reflex

chemoreflex

a physiological reflex initiated by a chemical substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Slow breathing reduces chemoreflex response to hypoxia and hypercapnia, and increases baroreflex sensitivity.
2005) found a reduction in the ventilatory response to hypercapnia in swimmers after 12 weeks of inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program but no differences with their control group, indicating that the changes in chemoreflex threshold were the result of the TS.
The mechanisms for the activation of the SNS during 24 hour are not fully understood, but one possibility is that increased chemoreflex gain by OSA results in tonic chemoreflex activation even during normoxia, with consequent increased sympathetic activity (26).
The exact mechanism of improvement is not completely understood, but might be related to improvement in airway structure, neurophysiologic regulation of respiration, and chemoreflex function (117).
Chemoreflex control of breathing during wakefulness in healthy men and women.
1,16) LPR has also been associated with sudden infant death syndrome, (13,26-34) probably mediated through the laryngeal chemoreflex.
E]) and systemic blood pressure are elevated by a chemoreflex stimulated by buildup of metabolic byproducts in the ischemic limbs; the most likely candidate is hydrogen ion concentration ([H.
It thus follows that S100B cannot be increased solely during conditions of cerebral ischemia, and hence cerebral damage, but it is better related to fetal hypoxic stress, which leads to redistribution of blood flow by triggering a chemoreflex response.
The respiratory drive operates mainly under chemoreflex control.
Lidocaine effects on the laryngeal chemoreflex, mechanoreflex, and afferent electrical stimulation reflex.