chemoreflex

che·mo·re·flex

(kē'mō-rē'fleks),
A reflex initiated by the stimulation of chemoreceptors, for example, of a carotid body.

chemoreflex

[-rē′fleks]
any reflex initiated by the stimulation of chemical receptors, such as those of the carotid and aortic bodies, which respond to changes in carbon dioxide, hydrogen ion, and oxygen concentrations in the blood. See also chemoreceptor.

chemoreflex

(ke?mo-re'fleks) [? + L. reflectere, to bend back]
Any involuntary response initiated by a chemical stimulus. Synonym: chemical reflex

chemoreflex

a physiological reflex initiated by a chemical substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
10] Progesterone decreases the threshold and increases the sensitivity of the central ventilator chemoreflex response to carbon dioxide.
Altered nitric oxide mechanism within the paraventricular nucleus contributes to the augmented carotid body chemoreflex in heart failure.
with simultaneous metaboreflex and chemoreflex activation was conducted on 13 healthy participants randomized into three groups: gruop I had PC activation with isocapnic hypoxia, group II had isometric handgrip exercise in normoxia and group III had metaboreflex activation in exercise during hypoxia [11].
SKY decreases chemoreflex sensitivity, increases arterial baroreceptor sensitivity, oxygenation, and exercises tolerance.
Slow breathing reduces chemoreflex response to hypoxia and hypercapnia, and increases baroreflex sensitivity.
Peripheral chemoreflex and baroreflex interactions in cardiovascular regulation in humans.
2005) found a reduction in the ventilatory response to hypercapnia in swimmers after 12 weeks of inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program but no differences with their control group, indicating that the changes in chemoreflex threshold were the result of the TS.
Slow breathing reduces sympathetic activity quickly, tends to increase baroreflex sensitivity and reduces chemoreflex sensitivity (17, 24) in COPD patients.
Role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the early stages of ventilatory acclimatization to altitude.
The mechanisms for the activation of the SNS during 24 hour are not fully understood, but one possibility is that increased chemoreflex gain by OSA results in tonic chemoreflex activation even during normoxia, with consequent increased sympathetic activity (26).