chemoautotrophic


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

chemoautotrophic

 [ke″mo-au″to-trof´ik]
capable of synthesizing cell constituents from carbon dioxide by means of energy derived from inorganic reactions.

che·mo·au·to·tro·phic

(kē'mō-aw-tō-trof'ik),
Pertaining to a chemoautotroph.
Synonym(s): chemolithotrophic

chemoautotrophic

/che·mo·au·to·tro·phic/ (-aw″to-tro´fik) capable of synthesizing cell constituents from carbon dioxide with energy from inorganic reactions.

che·mo·au·to·tro·phic

(kē'mō-aw-tō-trō'fik)
Pertaining to a chemoautotroph.
Synonym(s): chemolithotrophic.

chemoautotrophic

or

chemotrophic

(of an organism) capable of manufacturing organic molecules from carbon dioxide and water by a process of CHEMOSYNTHESIS. For example, Thiobacillus oxidizes hydrogen sulphide to sulphur in order to produce the energy for chemosynthesis. Chemoautotrophic organisms are one form of AUTOTROPH, the other form displaying PHOTOTROPISM. Nitrate bacteria, such as Nitrobacter, and nitrite bacteria, such as Nitrosomonas, which contribute to the NITROGEN CYCLE, also grow chemoautotrophically Nitrobacter obtains the energy by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate, while Nitrosomonas oxidizes ammonia to nitrite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the chemoautotrophic nitrifiers, which do not grow below pH 5, the heterotrophic nitrifiers are active in acid soils, particularly forest soils.
They present different feeding modes (carnivores, herbivores, omnivores, deposit-feeders, symbiotic chemoautotrophic bacteria), this plasticity could be the reason of their success in many environments (Beesley et al.
Chemoautotrophic bacteria, such as those that live associated with the vents of the ocean ridges, are the only benthic primary producers that are not photosynthetic.
In Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium sensitive to mercury ions, a group of mercury-resistant strains, which volatilize mercury, has been isolated.
Desulfovibrio and other chemoautotrophic bacteria produce sulfuric and nitric acid' which increase limestone dissolution.
However, the discovery on the ocean floors of entire communities of organisms that utilize chemoautotrophic bacteria to extract energy from the hydrogen sulfides which are spewed out of hydrothermal vents reminds us that there are also significant exceptions.
He does, however, discuss other deposit feeding bivalves and bivalves with chemoautotrophic symbionts.
Although a few cave communities depend on chemoautotrophic production (Sarbu et al.
Here sulfide-rich effluents support dense communities of free-living bacteria, as well as tube worms and mollusks living in symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria (internal bacteria that fix organic carbon using chemical energy from reduced compounds such as sulfide).
Inorganics are also present, and some of them, such as ammonia, promote the growth of chemoautotrophic bacteria.
In deep-sea hydrothermal vents and seeps, symbiotic associations between invertebrates and chemoautotrophic bacteria are common (Cavanaugh et al.