chemo brain


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chemo brain

n.
Cognitive dysfunction, such as difficulties with memory, attention, or concentration, that results from chemotherapy. Also called chemo fog.

chemo brain

A colloquial term for difficulties with concentration and memory that may follow the administration of some forms of cancer chemotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
I do want to share with you, though, what I have found hardest to deal with, what has prompted me to say "yes" to writing this article, when I have chemo brain and am lucky enough to remember that I haven't said the children can have chocolate for breakfast, lunch and dinner for a week, and that is this--the dehumanising experience of being treated like a number, a diagnosis, a treatment plan, a job to be done, a cancer.
This approach is buttressed by an understanding of the pathophysiology of chemo brain and utilization of targeted botanicals and nutrients that address aspects of this pathophysiology.
The existence of chemo brain in the medical literature is a fairly new phenomenon, as it has only been scientifically validated within the last decade.
The study is relevant to the legions of cancer survivors who experience a frustrating decline in cognitive function after chemotherapy treatment, known as chemo brain.
1) Studies in Japan found that chemo brain appears to be related to a reversible shrinking of brain structures induced by chemotherapy.
Clinicians, regardless of specialization, are encouraged to consider the possibility of chemo brain in order to prioritize the delivery of rehabilitative strategies in an effort to mitigate or reverse its features.
There may be some overlap between chemo brain and fatigue, Dr.
However, a growing body of evidence is now leading doctors to accept the reality of chemo brain.
However a growing body of evidence is now leading doctors to accept the reality of chemo brain.
While chemo brain has only recently drawn systematic scientific scrutiny, on cologists have long observed anecdotally that adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for breast cancer seem to be associated with loss of short-term memory, slower reaction time and thought processing, and reduced ability to concentrate on tasks, he noted.
Using positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), researchers were able to detect physiological evidence of chemo brain, a common side effect in patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer treatment.
Posit Science scientists were inspired to do this study by people like Cynthia Ryan, who suffered from chemo brain.