chemical pneumonia

chem·i·cal pneu·mo·ni·a

pneumonia caused by inhalation of toxic gas, such as phosgene or chlorine, used as weapons of war; exudation into alveoli causes the lungs to be edematous and hemorrhagic; large amounts of fluid that fill the air passages block gaseous exchange; recovery occurs, permanent damage of the lungs remains, and recurrent pulmonary infections are common.

chemical pneumonia

Chonic lung inflammation secondary to inhaled toxins—e.g., phosgene or chlorine, organic dust, fungi or spores.
 
Clinical findings
Cough, fever, shortness of breath, wheezing, decreased O2 exchange. Acute: oedema, hypoxia; chronic: interstitial fibrosis, possibly respiratory failure.
 
Imaging
 Chronic interstitial lung changes, pulmonary oedema.
 
Agents
Bleach, cleaners, beryllium (in old fluorescent light bulbs), methylene chloride (paint strippers).

The pathogenesis of CP is identical to aspiration pneumonia.

chemical pneumonia

Chemical pneumonitis Pulmonology Chronic lung inflammation 2º to inhaled toxins–eg, phosgene or chlorine, organic dust, fungi or spores CXR Chronic interstitial lung changes, pulmonary edema Clinical Cough, fever, SOB, wheezing, ↓ O2 exchange–acute with edema, hypoxia; chronic with interstitial fibrosis, possibly respiratory failure Agents Bleach, cleaners, beryllium–in old fluorescent lightbulbs, methylene chloride–paint strippers. See Animal house fever, Aspiration pneumonia, Chemical warfare, Pneumonia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fumes inhaled from cadmium alloys, coatings, and silver soldering can cause chemical pneumonia, a condition that can prove fatal if not treated quickly.
Most deaths were caused by chemical pneumonia following aspiration of the substance into the lungs.