chemical carcinogen


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chemical carcinogen

Etymology: Gk, chemeia, alchemy, karkinos, crab, oma, tumor, genein, to produce
any chemical agent that can induce the development of cancer in living tissue.

chemical carcinogen

Any chemical substance capable of causing cancer.
See also: carcinogen
References in periodicals archive ?
A growing body of toxicological research suggests that most chemical carcinogens cause their damage by binding to DNA, forming adducts.
An evaluation of 6 short-term tests for detecting organic chemical carcinogens.
DBM* and its synthetic derivatives have been reported to inhibit the mutagenicity and nucleic acid binding of chemical carcinogens in vitro (Choshi et al.
AC mouse model for identification of chemical carcinogens.
Park's own area of specialty is in the relationship between the herpes simplex and human papilloma viruses, chemical carcinogens and cancer.
The trial of chemical carcinogens by a jury of doctors, media, industry and environmental groups remains hung until a smoking gun is discovered.
Certain CNVs also appear to influence drug metabolism and increase sensitivity to particular chemical carcinogens, which will also help to decipher the complex ways in which an individual's genes and the environment impact disease.
Both the NCI and ACS are locked at the hip in policies fixated on damage control -- screening, diagnosis, treatment and treatment-related research -- with indifference to cancer prevention due to avoidable exposures to chemical carcinogens in cosmetics, other consumer products, air and water.
Al Meyerhoff, senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said that even though chemical carcinogens in foods are much less significant than tobacco, alcohol and obesity as causes of cancer, "they can still cause thousands of cancers in consumers, and they should be avoided wherever possible.
The object is to understand how all of these molecular components of the system are interrelated, and then predict how the mRNAs or proteins, for example, are affected by disturbances such as genetic mutations, infectious agents, or chemical carcinogens.
This fact alone should make the identification of chemical carcinogens a priority (Schmahl 1988).
Beese and her colleagues also plan to photograph their polymerase as it tries to copy DNA attached to known chemical carcinogens.