chemical carcinogen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

chemical carcinogen

Etymology: Gk, chemeia, alchemy, karkinos, crab, oma, tumor, genein, to produce
any chemical agent that can induce the development of cancer in living tissue.

chemical carcinogen

Any chemical substance capable of causing cancer.
See also: carcinogen
References in periodicals archive ?
The identified proteins were associated with HaCaT DNBS damage, which also implicates they might be potential targets for skin cell damage and skin diseases caused by chemical carcinogens.
A growing body of toxicological research suggests that most chemical carcinogens cause their damage by binding to DNA, forming adducts.
Morphologic and growth effects of tobacco-associated chemical carcinogens and smokeless tobacco extracts on human oral epithelial cells in culture.
Chromosome tests with 134 compounds on Chinese hamster cells in vitro: a screening for chemical carcinogens.
Not even over safety issues such as working with chemical carcinogens.
accept such case studies "as evidence in making causal inferences," especially about reactions to drugs, poisons, and chemical carcinogens.
DBM has been reported to antagonize the mutagenicity of several chemical carcinogens in vitro and has recently been shown to be even more effective than curcumin in suppressing the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumors in rats.
He is concerned about glyphosate, an herbicide ingredient that can break down to chemical carcinogens under certain conditions.
A better question would be, "How many lives can we save if we remove chemical carcinogens from the air?
At the end of the book, I stake out a philosophical argument about the use of chemical carcinogens and our dependence on them in our economy.
Animal testing is fairly reliable, for reasons Steingraber explains: Essential processes, such as the regulation of cell division and the extraction of energy born a molecule of glucose through its stepwise disassembly, are common to all members of the animal kingdom, so chemical carcinogens tend to inflict the same kind of cellular sabotage across species lines.
Specifically, there is a clear inconsistency in the levels of acceptable health risk associated with 1) standards for radionuclides only developed under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act and 2) standards developed under other authorities for all carcinogens including radionuclides or for chemical carcinogens only.