chelate

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Related to chelations: Chelant

chelate

 [ke´lāt]
1. to combine with a metal in complexes in which the metal is part of a ring.
2. by extension, a chemical compound in which a metallic ion is sequestered and firmly bound into a ring within the chelating molecule. Chelates are used in chemotherapy of metal poisoning.

che·late

(kē'lāt),
1. To effect chelation.
2. Pertaining to chelation.
3. A complex formed through chelation.

chelate

/che·late/ (ke´lāt)
1. to combine with a metal in complexes in which the metal is part of a ring.
2. by extension, a chemical compound in which a metallic ion is sequestered and firmly bound into a ring within the chelating molecules. Chelates are used in chemotherapy of metal poisoning.

chelate

(kē′lāt′)
adj. Zoology
Having chelae or resembling a chela.
n. Chemistry
A chemical compound in the form of a heterocyclic ring, containing a metal ion attached by coordinate bonds to at least two nonmetal ions.
tr.v. che·lated, che·lating, che·lates
1. Chemistry To combine (a metal ion) with a chemical compound to form a ring.
2. Medicine To remove (a heavy metal, such as lead or mercury) from the bloodstream by means of a chelate, such as EDTA.

che′lat·a·ble adj.
che·la′tion n.
che′la′tor n.

chelate

[kē′lāt]
Etymology: Gk, chele, claw
1 v, to form a bond, thus creating a ringlike complex. An example is the interaction of a metal ion and two or more polar groups of a single molecule.
2 n, (in medicine) any coordination compound composed of a central metal ion and an organic molecule with multiple bonds arranged in ring formations, used especially in chemotherapeutic treatments for metal poisoning.
3 adj, pertaining to chelation.

che·late

(kē'lāt)
1. To effect chelation.
2. Pertaining to chelation.
3. A complex formed through chelation.

chelate

  1. possessing claws or pincer-like appendages.
  2. to combine with a metal ion to form a stable compound.

Chelate

A chemical that binds to heavy metals in the blood, thereby helping the body to excrete them in urine.
Mentioned in: Nephrotoxic Injury

chelate

to combine with a metal in complexes in which the metal is part of a ring; by extension, a chemical compound in which a metallic ion is sequestered and firmly bound into a ring within the chelating molecule. Chelates are used in treatment of metal poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients were randomized to receive 40 infusions, 30 weekly and then an additional 10, 2 to 8 weeks apart, of an EDTA-based chelation regimen whose components we went throughout.
What we found at the end of the follow-up period when we unblinded the study was that there was an 18% reduction in risk of having one of these recurrent cardiovascular events in the group overall with EDTA chelation with a p-value of .
Because they were on very appropriate medication, then you can obviously say the chelation therapy filled in some of the blanks, so to speak, in the treatment.
So chelation therapy filled in to where the medication wasn't benefiting, so to speak.
I guess that the way that I would state that is that the improvement in the rate of outcomes in the chelation group suggests that chelation is touching upon different mechanisms of benefit that traditional drugs .
KH: Could you say that IV chelation therapy did not have an adverse effect on the effective drugs?
Studies in Switzerland and Germany support using intravenous phosphatidylcholine, especially when combined with EDTA chelation therapy, to restore vascular cellular membrane integrity (see www.
Oral EDTA chelation has always been a helpful adjunct to intravenous chelation.
In mid-September 2004, he appeared in my office, interested in chelation therapy and an integrative approach to his heart disease.
After several weeks of nutrient repletion, Rocky started chelation therapy with a low dose of disodium, magnesium EDTA to begin.
The correlation between EDTA chelation therapy and improvement in cardiovascular function: a meta-analysis.
EDTA chelation therapy in myocardial stunning and hibernation.