chelation


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Related to chelation: EDTA

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn),
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; in heme, the Fe2+ ion is chelated by the porphyrin ring. Chelation can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by EDTA, which thus acts as an anticoagulant.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

[kēlā′shən]
a chemical reaction in which there is a combination with a metal to form a ring-shaped molecular complex in which the metal is firmly bound and isolated. See also chelating agent.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, which thus acts as an anticoagulant in vitro.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

the binding of a metal ion to an organic molecule from which it can later be released. In complex molecules, chelation results in, for example, zinc binding with amino acids in carboxypeptidase enzymes. Some chelating agents, such as penicillamine, are drugs used to treat metal poisoning: the metal is bound to the drug and can then be excreted safely Chelation also enables plants to take up metal ions such as iron that are not readily available in a free state.

Chelation

The process by which a molecule encircles and binds to a metal and removes it from tissue.
Mentioned in: Heavy Metal Poisoning

chelation

removal of ions so that they are unavailable to participate in biological reactions; tea chelates dietary iron (Fe2+), preventing its absorption; excessive tea drinking can exacerbate tendency to iron-deficiency anaemia, especially in the elderly

chelation (kē·lāˑ·shn),

n 1. medical treatment in which heavy metals are flushed from the bloodstream by means of a chelator that binds metal ions; used in cases of mercury or lead poisoning.
2. the process of ring formation by forming one or more hydrogen bonds.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation (kēlā´shən),

n chemical reaction of a metallic ion (e.g., calcium ion) with a suitable reactive compound (e.g., ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid) to form a compound in which the metal ion is tightly bound.
chelation therapy,
n the use of a chelating agent to bind firmly and sequester metallic poisons.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2015, chelation was put through a Cochrane review - the gold standard for medical evidence - which found no evidence that it had any effect against autism.
Thyroid dysfunction is reported in 26% patients with b-thalassemia major, but its severity and frequency varies in different cohorts according to chelation regimens5-7.
Dr Sibia, Director of a heart centre in Ludhiana in Punjab (India) informed that in addition to Chelation Therapy cardiovascular rehabilitation program should include aggressive lifestyle change for all heart patients with or without angioplasty, stents or bypass surgery specially for patients with complex cardiovascular conditions, such as diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, and multi-vessel coronary artery disease.
In children with Impaired Glucose Tolerance [IGT], duration of chelation correlated significantly with duration of transfusion [0.
Before the start of oral chelation, the patient should have daily bowel movements.
Concerning chelation therapy, Co and Cr chelation in MOM hip-implanted patients has been described in few cases.
Chelation therapy in beta-thalassemia: an optimistic update.
With the advent of chelation therapy, the survival of thalassemia major patients have increased and they are entering even into third and fourth decades of life11.
Conclusion: Deferasirox is an effective oral chelation agent for AY-thalassemia major patients.
Chelation has killed three people overseas since 2003, including a child with autism.
meditation or prayer), homeopathic remedies, probiotics, alternative diets or more invasive therapies such as vitamin B-12 injections, intravenous immunoglobulin or chelation therapy - some of which carry significant risks.