methyl salicylate

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methyl

 [meth´il]
the chemical group or radical -CH3.
methyl salicylate a natural or synthetic oil with a characteristic wintergreen odor and taste; used as a counterirritant in ointments or liniments for muscle pain and also as a flavoring agent. Called also wintergreen oil.

salicylate

 [sah-lis´ĭ-lāt]
any salt or ester of salicylic acid; those used as drugs for their analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory effects include aspirin, choline salicylate, magnesium salicylate, and sodium salicylate. Low dosages of salicylates are used primarily for the relief of mild to moderate pain or fever; high dosages are particularly useful for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatoid disorders.



The mechanism of most of the effects of aspirin and other salicylates is inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, thus blocking pyretic and inflammatory processes that are mediated by prostaglandins. Aspirin also prolongs bleeding time through its effects on platelets owing to both inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and acetylation of platelet structures. Salicylates also cause ulceration and hemorrhagic lesions of the gastric mucosa. They act by interfering with the stomach's mucosal barrier (either directly or possibly by an effect on prostaglandins when given parenterally) so that H+ ions leak and there is subsequent damage. Aspirin should not be taken with alcohol, because this increases gastrointestinal damage. Aspirin should be avoided by persons with gastric ulcers, hemophilia, or hemorrhagic states, and by children with a viral illness.

Another problem associated with the use of salicylates is hypersensitivity. This most commonly occurs with aspirin and is less common with other salicylates. Aspirin-sensitive individuals often also react to other antiinflammatory agents, such as indomethacin, and to a yellow dye used to color foods and drugs called tartrazine or FD & C Yellow No. 5. The allergic reaction usually takes the form of edema of the face and intestinal tract and asthma. Aspirin sensitivity occurs in about 0.25–1.0 per cent of the population and is more common in persons with a history of asthma or other allergic disorders. There is a common association with nasal polyps.
Salicylate Poisoning. Mild salicylate toxicity, which can occur from high dosage therapy, has symptoms that include headache, dizziness, tinnitus, deafness, nausea, vomiting, and acid-base disturbances. If the poisoning occurs in the home, a poison control center should be contacted immediately. Large overdoses produce acute poisoning that is a medical emergency. Treatment consists of gastrointestinal decontamination, administration of intravenous fluids to correct dehydration and acid-base imbalance, and hemodialysis if serum salicylate levels are very high. Body sponging with cool water is done for hyperpyrexia. Blood salicylate levels and blood gases and electrolytes are periodically determined by laboratory tests. Life-threatening poisoning may require exchange transfusion or renal dialysis.
methyl salicylate see under methyl.

meth·yl sa·lic·y·late

(meth'il să-lis'ĭ-lāt),
The methyl ester of salicylic acid, produced synthetically or distilled from Gaultheria procumbens (family Ericaceae) or from Betula lenta (family Betulaceae); used externally and internally for the treatment of various forms of rheumatism.

methyl salicylate

n.
The methyl ester of salicylic acid, C8H8O3, an essential oil derived from birch or wintergreen or made synthetically, used as a counterirritant in ointments to treat muscle pain.

methyl salicylate

methyl salicylate

An aromatic compound used externally as an embrocation often in combination with other ingredients. Also known as Oil of Wintergreen. Brand names of formulations containing methyl salicylate are Balmosa, Monphytol, Phytex, Radian B and Salonpas.

methyl salicylate

constituent of undecenoate antifungal paints and proprietary rubefacient chilblain creams; induces local erythema when applied to skin (see rubefacients)

methyl

the monovalent radical, −CH3.

methyl alcohol
see methyl alcohol.
methyl bromide
a soil and grain fumigant. Poisoning by this compound causes incoordination and somnolence. Called also bromoethane.
methyl carbamate
methyl demeton
an organophosphorus insecticide. Called also methyl systox, oxydemeton-methyl.
methyl harmane (3-methyl)
carboline toxin found in plants.
methyl hydroxybenzoate
methyl p-hydroxybenzoate
a sex pheromone in the vaginal secretions of the bitch in estrus; it stimulates mounting behavior in dogs.
methyl orange
an orange-yellow aniline dye, used as an indicator with a pH range of 3.2-4.4 and a color change from pink to yellow.
methyl parathion
a very toxic organophosphorus insecticide.
methyl red test
a biochemical test for identification of enterobacteria.
methyl salicylate
a natural or synthetic wintergreen oil, used as a topical analgesic and as a clearing agent when mounting parasites. Called also oil of sweet birch.
methyl systox
see methyl demeton (above).