Charm

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Folk medicine A talisman used to ward off evil and promote health

CHARM

Cardiology A clinical trial–Candesartan cilexitil or Atacand in Heart Failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality & Morbidity.
References in classic literature ?
Him I abolished by arguments and prayers, proving that our charms are worthier than his coloured waters.
She liked charms with plenty of ink that one could wash off in water, swallow, and be done with.
But I would ask thy Holy One - stand aside, rogue - a charm against most lamentable windy colics that in mango-time overtake my daughter's eldest.
But this, to say the truth, is often too dearly purchased; and though it hath charms so inexpressible, that the French, perhaps, among other qualities, mean to express this, when they declare they know not what it is; yet its absence is well compensated by innocence; nor can good sense and a natural gentility ever stand in need of it.
It may be, of course, above all, that what suddenly broke into this gives the previous time a charm of stillness-- that hush in which something gathers or crouches.
These, she thought, must be the charm, so she read the directions carefully and put the Cap upon her head.
This ended the saying of the charm, and they heard a great chattering and flapping of wings, as the band of Winged Monkeys flew up to them.
Hayward found him stupid, but Lawson recognised his charm and was eager to paint him; he was a picturesque figure with his blue eyes, white skin, and curly hair.
For this new edition adds to the original merits of the work the very substantial charm of abundant illustrations, first-rate in subject and execution, and of three kinds--copper-plate likenesses of actors and other personages connected with theatrical history; a series of delicate, picturesque, highly detailed woodcuts of theatrical topography, chiefly the little old theatres; and, by way of tail-pieces to the chapters, a second series of woodcuts of a vigour and reality of information, within very limited compass, which make one think of Callot and the German [76] "little masters," depicting Garrick and other famous actors in their favourite scenes.
Noticeable again, among the whole-plate portraits, is the thoroughly reassuring countenance of Steele, the singularly fine heads of John, Charles, and Fanny Kemble, while the certainly plain, pinched countenance of William Davenant reminds one of Charles Kean, and might well have lighted up, as did his, when the soul came into it, into power and charm, as the speaking eyes assure us even in its repose.
He stood up in the boat, lifted up both his arms, then pointed to the infallible charm.
I wonder whether the charm worked--you remember Hollis's charm, of course.