charlock


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Related to charlock: wild radish

charlock

sinapisarvensis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Charlock, Poppy's mother, sets out to right a wrong from the past and reunite Leo with his long lost mother as Leo has discovered his own emerging powers as a much feared rare male witch.
The superweed appears to be a hybrid of a wild local plant, charlock (Sinapsis arvensis) with GM oilseed rape.
In addition, recent UK Government research has reported the discovery of the first genetically modified 'superweed' - the result of GM oilseed rape cross-breeding with the common weed charlock in the UK farm scale trials.
At one test site, the researchers found a GM version of the common weed charlock growing in the field, the year after the GM trial.
Enviromental group Friends of the Earth suspect that a trial site at an Aberdeenshire farm is where the gene escaped as GM oilseed rape cross-bred with common weed charlock.
The poem is notable for homely Lincolnshire images like the "field of charlock in the sudden sun / Between two showers" (380-81), and for its parallel obsession with the nature of public achievement, as when Gareth compares himself with his two brothers, Gawain and Modred:
Hannah Mounsher, 15, of Charlock Close, Thornhill, Cardiff, disappeared from her home on December 27.
Other plants sought out by the adult females include garlic mustard and charlock.
The next most frequent broad-leaved weeds identified by farmers were mayweed (infesting 86pc of winter wheat), chickweed (infesting 82pc of the crop), charlock (75pc of the total crop), common field speedwell (69pc), fat hen (68pc), volunteer oilseed rape (68pc), field pansy (65pc) common poppy (60pc), knotgrass (59pc) and groundsel (58pc).
In the 17th century farmers moved strongly into growing rapeseed for an industrial oil, as well as experimenting less successfully in pressing other seeds like charlock, poppies, and nettles for oil; they learned from the Continent to grow buckwheat for fattening poultry; they learned to grow roots for feeding livestock, and potatoes from America to feed people; and they absorbed from the Continent clover, sainfoin, and lucerne into their arable rotations.