chaperone

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chap·e·rone

(shap-ĕ-rōn),
1. A protein required for the proper folding and/or assembly of another protein or protein complex.
2. One who accompanies a physician during physical examination of a patient of the opposite gender (from the physician).
[Eng. escort, protector, fr. Fr. chaperon, hood, fr. chape, cape, fr. L.L. cappa, fr. L. caput, head]

chaperone

/chap·er·one/ (shap´er-ōn) someone or something that accompanies and oversees another.
molecular chaperone  any of a diverse group of proteins that oversee the correct intracellular folding and assembly of polypeptides without being components of the final structure.

chaperone

or

chaperon

(shăp′ə-rōn′)
n.
Any of a diverse group of proteins that assist macromolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, to assemble and fold into the proper three-dimensional structure as they are being synthesized. Also called molecular chaperone.

chap′er·on′age (-rō′nĭj) n.

chaperone

Cell biology
Any of a class of cytoplasmic proteins found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which facilitate the correct assembly or disassembly of newly synthesised oligomeric protein complexes, participating in transmembrane targeting and protein folding.

Medspeak-UK
A person, generally employed by a medical doctor or (NHS) hospital trust, who stays with the patient while the doctor is examining a patient or performing a procedure.
 
Vox populi
A person who accompanies a child or adolescent under the age of majority (adulthood) during an event such as a date or a school dance.

chap·e·rone

(shap'ĕ-rōn)
1. A protein required for the proper folding and/or assembly of another protein or protein complex.
2. One who accompanies a physician during physical examination of a patient of the opposite gender (from that of the physician).
[Eng. escort, protector, fr. Fr. chaperon, hood, fr. chape, cape, fr. L.L. cappa, fr. L. caput, head]

chaperone

a PROTEIN MOLECULE which can assist in the folding, assembly or transport of other proteins in a CELL.

chaperone

a family of proteins that aid in the folding of target proteins.
References in periodicals archive ?
To solve the woman question - including those issues of sexuality, freedom, chaperonage, the overvaluing of "virtue," marital choicelessness and sexual manipulation (all issues with a muted biographical meaning) - Loy proposed the annihilation of "the principal instrument of [female] subjection.
From the late nineteenth century onward, chaperonage was declining in popularity, and this aspect of diminishing social segregation was often discussed in etiquette books.
Cafes, the growth of tea rooms, the use of buses, even the provision of public lavatories for women, were as important in freeing middle-class women from strict social ritual as the slow erosion of chaperonage.
8) By the inter-war period, "the reduced scale of living for most of the middle class, the decline of chaperonage and new freedom for girls, meant that even the 'career' sequence of schoolgirl, deb (or provincial variant), daughter-at-home, matron and dowager wielding power in the social/political world, had ceased to have much cogency .
For I hope you won't think me very fanciful in saying I should have no pleasure in doing any such pictures, now that I know I am only permitted such a privilege on condition of being under chaperonage.
He claims that the "informalization" of manners from 1890-2000, evidenced by the change from chaperonage to dating systems of courting, led to the emancipation of women in all four countries under study (2).
Wouters examines the informalization of manners by describing the transition, which occurred toward the beginning of the twentieth century in all four countries under study, from a chaperonage system of courting to that which became known as dating.
Chaperonage remained an important institution among East Side Jews, but parents considered it appropriate for their daughter to go for walks and to dances with men, as long as the parents knew about the excursion beforehand and had met the young man.