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chain

 [chān]
a collection of objects linked together in linear fashion, or end to end, as the assemblage of atoms or radicals in a chemical compound, or an assemblage of individual bacterial cells.
branched chain an open chain of atoms, usually carbon, with one or more side chains attached to it.
closed chain several atoms linked together so as to form a ring, which may be saturated, as in cyclopentane, or aromatic, as in benzene.
H chain (heavy chain) any of the large polypeptide chains of five classes that, paired with the L or light chains, make up the antibody molecule of an immunoglobulin; heavy chains bear the antigenic determinants that differentiate the classes of immunoglobulins. See also heavy chain disease.
J chain a polypeptide occurring in polymeric IgM and IgA molecules.
L chain (light chain) either of the two small polypeptide chains (molecular weight 22,000) that, when linked to H or heavy chains by disulfide bonds, make up the antibody molecule of an immunoglobulin monomer; they are of two types, kappa and lambda, which are unrelated to immunoglobulin class differences.
open chain a series of atoms united in a straight line; components of this series are related to methane.
chain reaction a chemical reaction that is self-propagating; each time a free radical is destroyed a new one is formed.
side chain a group of atoms attached to a larger chain or to a ring.

chain

(chān),
1. chemistry a series of atoms held together by one or more covalent bonds.
See also: sympathetic trunk.
2. bacteriology a linear arrangement of living cells that have divided in one plane and remain attached to each other.
See also: sympathetic trunk.
3. A series of reactions.
See also: sympathetic trunk.
4. In anatomy, a linked series of structures, for example, ossicular chain, chain ganglia , under ganglion.
See also: sympathetic trunk.
[L. catena]

chain

(chān) a collection of objects linked end to end.
branched chain  an open chain of atoms, usually carbon, with one or more side chains attached to it.
closed chain  several atoms linked together so as to form a ring, which may be saturated, as in cyclopentane, or aromatic, as in benzene.
electron transport chain  the final common pathway of biological oxidation, the series of electron carriers in the inner mitochondrial membrane that pass electrons from reduced coenzymes to molecular oxygen via sequential redox reactions coupled to proton transport, generating energy for biological processes.
Enlarge picture
Electron transport chain showing the three sites of coupling with oxidative phosphorylation, generating adenosine triphosphate.
H chain , heavy chain any of the large polypeptide chains of five classes that, paired with the light chains, make up the antibody molecule. Heavy chains bear the antigenic determinants that differentiate the immunoglobulin classes.
J chain  a polypeptide occurring in polymeric IgM and IgA molecules.
L chain , light chain either of the two small polypeptide chains (molecular weight 22,000) that, when linked to heavy chains by disulfide bonds, make up the antibody molecule; they are of two types, kappa and lambda, which are unrelated to immunoglobulin class differences.
open chain  a series of atoms united in a straight line; compounds of this series are related to methane.
polypeptide chain  the structural element of protein, consisting of a series of amino acid residues (peptides) joined together by peptide bonds.
respiratory chain  electron transport c.
side chain  a group of atoms attached to a larger chain or to a ring.

chain

Etymology: L, catena
1 a length of several units linked together in a linear pattern, such as a polypeptide chain of amino acids or a chain of atoms forming a chemical molecule.
2 a group of individual bacteria linked together, such as streptococci formed by a chain of cocci.
3 the serial relationship of certain structures essential to function, such as the chain of ossicles in the middle ear. Each of the small bones moves successively in response to vibration of the tympanic membrane, thus transmitting the auditory stimulus to the oval window. See also chain ligature.
4 a connected series, such as a chain of events.

CHAIN

Abbreviation for:
Contact, Help, Advice, and Information Network (Medspeak-UK)
Contrast Hierarchical Alignment and Interaction Network

chain

(chān)
1. chemistry A series of atoms held together by one or more covalent bonds.
2. bacteriology A linear arrangement of living cells that have divided in one plane and remain attached to each other.
3. A series of reactions.
4. anatomy A linked series of structures, e.g., ossicular chain, chain ganglia.
See also: sympathetic trunk

chain

(chān)
bacteriology a linear arrangement of living cells that have divided in one plane and remain attached to each other.

chain

a collection of objects linked together in linear fashion, or end to end, as the assemblage of atoms or radicals in a chemical compound, or an assemblage of individual bacterial cells.

chain binomial model
model of an outbreak of an infectious disease in which the outbreak is depicted as a series of steps with a binomial statement of the probability of an outcome at each step.
branched chain
an open chain of atoms, usually carbon, with one or more side chains attached to it.
heavy chain
any of the large polypeptide chains of five classes that, paired with the light chains, make up the antibody molecule. Heavy chains bear the antigenic determinants that differentiate the immunoglobulin classes. See also heavy-chain disease.
J chain
a polypeptide occurring in polymeric IgM and IgA molecules.
light chain
either of the two small polypeptide chains (molecular weight 22,000) that, when linked to heavy chains by disulfide bonds, make up the antibody molecule; they are of two types, kappa and lambda, which are unrelated to immunoglobulin class differences.
light chain disease
the overproduction of immunoglobulin light chain molecules by certain B cell tumors (plasmacytomas). See monoclonal gammopathy.
obstetric chain
used in obstetrics in cattle and horses to snare extremities and for traction. Made of rustproof metal with links designed not to kink or to jam. They have a loop link at each end to facilitate single-handed formation of a loop. The links are shaped so that the ring-grip handles used for traction will grip at any point and stay put with the strongest pull.
chain shank
a leather lead with a short section of chain at the proximal end. It can be placed over the horse's nose, through the mouth or across the upper gum for greater control.
side chain
a chain of atoms attached to a larger chain or to a ring.
stallion chain
strong chain, 1-2 ft (0.5 m) long, at the end of a solid lead. For leading a stallion with little chance of his biting through the lead.
chain termination method
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