cervid

(redirected from cervids)
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Related to cervids: Cervidae

cervid

a member of the family Cervidae, deer, elk, reindeer, moose, wapiti, muntjacs and sikas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Molecular genetic characterisation of the cervid strain ("northern form") of Eohinooooous granulosus.
This is especially true given the highly contagious nature of the prion in cervids and the increasing prevalence of CWD.
Hjeljord and Histol (1999) claim the relationship between forage quality and elevation does not elicit the same response in moose as it does in other cervids.
Also, the incisor bar was collected for aging, and the liver and kidneys were sampled for inclusion in a cervid trace element study initiated by Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources, Canadian Wildlife Service, and Environment Canada.
Generally, the state Department of Agriculture manages threats from captive deer and other cervids, while the Game Commission manages threats from wild deer and elk.
The most usual animals in the Franco-Cantabrian caves, that is, horses, bovids, cervids and caprids, represent a total of 80 units, or 34% of the identifiable animals in the Grotte Chauvet, whereas the dangerous and generally rarer animals - rhinoceroses, felines, mammoths and bears - number 143, or almost double (60.
Infection in moose depends on continuous cohabitation with normal cervid hosts and appropriate conditions for transmission, including persistent aquatic habitat for the required, intermediate snail hosts of the genus Lymnaea.
No less than half of the identifiable figures are horses, with bovids and cervids in second place [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
High-risk cervid parts include: the head (including brain, tonsils, eyes and any lymph nodes); spinal cord/backbone; spleen; skull plate with attached antlers, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; cape, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if root structure or other soft tissue is present; any object or article containing visible brain or spinal cord tissue; unfinished taxidermy mounts; and brain-tanned hides.
This is relevant to the dispersal theory of Pleistocene evolution in ungulate fauna (Geist 1998), and is consistent with our current understanding of sex differences in life history strategies for large cervids.
The specific carcass parts that cannot be brought back to Pennsylvania by hunters are the ones where the CWD prions (the causative agent) concentrate in cervids, and they are: the head (including brain, tonsils, eyes and any lymph nodes); spinal cord/backbone; spleen; skull plate with attached antlers, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; cape, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if root structure or other soft tissue is present; any object or article containing visible brain or spinal cord tissue; unfinished taxidermy mounts; and brain-tanned hides.