vertigo

(redirected from cervical vertigo)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

vertigo

 [ver´tĭ-go]
a sensation of rotation or movement of one's self (subjective vertigo) or of one's surroundings (objective vertigo) in any plane. The term is sometimes used erroneously as a synonym for dizziness. Vertigo may result from diseases of the inner ear or may be due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.
benign paroxysmal positional vertigo recurrent vertigo and nystagmus occurring when the head is placed in certain positions, usually not associated with lesions of the central nervous system.
benign positional vertigo (benign postural vertigo) benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
central vertigo that due to disorder of the central nervous system.
cerebral vertigo vertigo resulting from a brain lesion, such as in meningogenic labyrinthitis. Called also organic vertigo.
disabling positional vertigo constant vertigo or dysequilibrium and nausea in the upright position, without hearing disturbance or loss of vestibular function.
labyrinthine vertigo Meniere's disease.
organic vertigo cerebral vertigo.
peripheral vertigo vestibular vertigo.
positional vertigo that associated with a specific position of the head in space or with changes in position of the head in space.
vestibular vertigo vertigo due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.

ver·ti·go

(ver-ti'gō), Although this word is correctly stressed on the second syllable, in U.S. usage it is often stressed on the first syllable.
1. A sensation of spinning or whirling motion. Vertigo implies a definite sensation of rotation of the subject (subjective vertigo) or of objects about the subject (objective vertigo) in any plane.
2. Imprecisely used as a general term to describe dizziness.
[L. vertigo (vertigin-), dizziness, fr. verto, to turn]

vertigo

/ver·ti·go/ (ver´tĭ-go) [L.] a sensation of rotation or movement of one's self (subjective v.) or of one's surroundings (objective v.) in any plane; sometimes used erroneously to mean any form of dizziness.vertig´inous
alternobaric vertigo  a transient, true, whirling vertigo sometimes affecting those subjected to large, rapid variations in barometric pressure.
benign paroxysmal postural vertigo  recurrent vertigo and nystagmus occurring when the head is placed in certain positions, usually not associated with lesions of the central nervous system.
cerebral vertigo  a type resulting from a brain lesion.
cervical vertigo  vertigo after injury to the neck such as whiplash.
disabling positional vertigo  constant positional vertigo or dysequilibrium and nausea with the head in the upright position, without hearing disturbance or loss of vestibular function.
labyrinthine vertigo  Meniere's disease.
objective vertigo  see vertigo.
ocular vertigo  a form due to eye disease.
organic vertigo  cerebral v.
positional vertigo , postural vertigo that associated with a specific position of the head in space or with changes in position of the head in space.
subjective vertigo  see vertigo.
vestibular vertigo  vertigo due to disturbances of the vestibular system.

vertigo

(vûr′tĭ-gō′)
n. pl. verti·goes or verti·gos
1.
a. The sensation of dizziness.
b. An instance of such a sensation.
2. A confused, disoriented state of mind.

vertigo

[vur′tigō, vurtī′gō]
a sensation of instability, giddiness, loss of equilibrium, or rotation, caused by a disturbance in the semicircular canal of the inner ear or the vestibular nuclei of the brainstem. The sensation that one's body is rotating in space is called subjective vertigo, whereas the sensation that objects are spinning around the body is termed objective vertigo. See also dizziness, postural vertigo, vestibular neuronitis.

vertigo

 Dizziness Neurology A distortion of perception characterized by a sensation of rotational movement or loss of equilibrium, a finding typical of vestibular dysfunction Clinical Often accompanied by nystagmus and, if severe, N&V Etiology Benign positional vertigo, Me´nière's disease, labyrinthitis, acoustic neuroma Treatment–medical If acute, diazepam; if recurrent, scopolamine; if nausea, antiemetic; if severe, bed rest; if recurrent, exercise Treatment–interventional Transmastoid labyrinthectomy, vestibular nerve section, middle ear endoscopy, semicircular canal ablation, streptomycin infusion. See Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Objective vertigo, Positional vertigo, Subjective vertigo. Cf Dizziness, Dizzy spell, Pseudovertigo.
Vertigo–duration
Seconds Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
Minutes to hours
a.  Idiopathic endolymphatic hydrops–Me´nie`re's disease
b.  Secondary endolymphatic hydrops
 
1. Otic syphilis
 .
2. Delayed endolymphatic hydrops
 .
3. Cogan's disease
 .
4. Recurrent vestibulopathy
Days Vestibular neuronitis
Variable duration
a.  Inner ear fistula
b.  Inner ear trauma
 1. Nonpenetrating trauma
 2. Penetrating trauma
3. Barotrauma
.

ver·ti·go

(vĕr'ti-gō)
1. A sensation of spinning or whirling motion; implies a definite sensation of rotation of the subject or of objects about the subject in any plane.
2. Imprecisely used as a general term to describe dizziness.
[L. vertigo (vertigin-), dizziness, fr. verto, to turn]

vertigo

The illusion that the environment, or the body, is rotating. Severe vertigo causes the sufferer to fall. It may be due to TRAVEL SICKNESS, fear of heights, anxiety, alcohol, drugs or HYPERVENTILATION. Some cases of the most severe and persistent vertigo may be caused by disorders of the balancing mechanisms in the inner ears, such as MÉNIÈRE'S DISEASE or LABYRINTHITIS, or to disease of the CEREBELLUM or its connections from VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY, TUMOUR or MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.

Vertigo

A sensation of dizziness marked by the feeling that one's self or surroundings are spinning or whirling.

vertigo,

n a condition in which the patient perceives the external world as spinning around him or her (objective vertigo), or the individual may feel as though he or she is revolving in space (subjective vertigo).

vertigo 

The sensation of irregular movement in space of either oneself or of external objects. It can be experienced after vestibular stimulation.

ver·ti·go

(vĕr'ti-gō)
1. A sensation of spinning or whirling motion; implies a definite sensation of rotation of the subject or of objects about the subject.
2. Imprecisely used to describe dizziness.
[L. vertigo (vertigin-), dizziness, fr. verto, to turn]

vertigo (vur´təgō),

n 1. a sensation described as dizziness.
n 2. a sensation of the room revolving about the patient or the patient revolving in space. It is a form of dizziness, but the terms are not synonymous.

Patient discussion about vertigo

Q. Is this Vertigo? When I stand on high places and look down and feel very dizzy. Is this vertigo?

A. Vertigo is often confused with a fear of heights. However, the dizzy feeling when you look down from a high place is not the same as vertigo, which can occur at any time and may last for many years.
Vertigo is more severe than dizziness, which is often experienced as a feeling of light-headedness when you stand up. Vertigo can make moving around difficult, as the sensation of spinning affects your balance.

Q. What causes Vertigo? My friend says she has vertigo and suffers from dizzy spells every now and then. Is this physiological or physical?

A. Vertigo is most commonly caused by a problem with the balancing mechanism in the inner ear. This is a coiled tube of fluid that lies behind the eardrum called the labyrinth. Viral infections such as a common cold or flu can spread to the labyrinth (labyrinthitis). Less commonly, labyrinthitis is caused by a bacterial infection of the middle ear (otitis media). Vertigo caused by an ear infection usually starts suddenly, and may be accompanied by a painful ear and high temperature.
Vertigo can also occur because of:
Arthritis in the neck, Migraines, Poor circulation, Motion sickness and over-breathing (hyperventilation), Alcohol and certain drugs.

Q. What Is The Difference Between Dizziness and Vertigo? I have really bad dizziness problems, and my doctor wrote down that I have "true vertigo". What is the difference between vertigo and dizziness?

A. Vertigo is a term that means there is a feeling as if in a spin. Dizziness describes any lack of stableness, not necessarily a true spinning sensation. There are two types of vertigo: subjective and objective. Subjective vertigo is when a person feels a false sensation of movement. Objective vertigo is when the surroundings will appear to move past a person's field of vision.

More discussions about vertigo