cervical triangle

cer·vi·cal tri·an·gle

any of the triangles of the neck.

cervical triangle

one of two triangular areas formed in the neck by the oblique course of the sternocleidomastoideus. The anterior triangle is bounded by the midline of the throat anteriorly, the sternocleidomastoideus laterally, and the body of the mandible superiorly. The posterior triangle is bounded by the clavicle inferiorly and by the borders of the sternocleidomastoideus and the trapezius superiorly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although third branchial cleft anomalies are rare, they are still the second most common congenital lesion of the posterior cervical triangle of the neck after lymphatic malformations.
Third branchial cleft cysts most commonly appear on CT and MRI as unilocular cystic lesions in the posterior cervical triangle.
Physical examination revealed an 8 x 6-cm, firm mass filling the right supraclavicular fossa and extending into the upper posterior cervical triangle.
Spinal accessory nerve palsy commonly occurs as a result of iatrogenic injury, usually during lymph node excision in the posterior cervical triangle.
The majority of spinal accessory nerve lesions occur after lymph node biopsy and tumor resection in the posterior cervical triangle (1-7).
Computed tomography scan of the neck showed multiple, bilateral, necrotic lymph nodes in the posterior cervical triangle, more notable on the right, with retropharyngeal abscesses (Figure).
Although the child went into apparent remission after 9 months of biochemotherapy, a follow-up PET scan at age 11 revealed abnormal loci in the liver, bilateral cervical triangle, and right paratracheal areas.
Although the child went into apparent remission after 9 months of biochemotherapy, a follow-up positron emission tomography scan at age 11 revealed abnormal loci in the liver, bilateral cervical triangle, and right paratracheal areas.
On initial examination in the emergency department, a soft, minimally tender, cystic mass was visible and easily palpable in the right posterior cervical triangle.
Most patients present with an asymptomatic cervical mass (typically in the apex of the posterior cervical triangle or in the superior jugular chain of nodes), serous otitis media, epistaxis, and/or nasal obstruction.
Approximately 75 to 80% of all lymphangiomas arise in the posterior cervical triangle.