cervical cord neurapraxia

cervical cord neurapraxia

Sports medicine A transient injury to the cervical spine resulting in neurologic sequelae; CCN are generally benign, but Pts should be counseled about recurrence, depending on the spinal canal/vertebral body ratio

cervical cord neurapraxia

Sports medicine A clinical entity due to developmental narrowing of the AP diameter of the cervical canal and acute mechanical deformation of the spinal cord; the typical CCN involves an athlete who has an acute transient neurologic episode of cervical cord origin Clinical Sensory changes–eg, burning pain, numbness, or tingling in both arms, both legs, all 4 extremities, or an ipsilateral arm and leg; in absence of instability or structural deficiency of the cervical spine, CCN is clinically benign, with complete neurologic recovery and no permanent morbidity in Pts who return to contact sports
References in periodicals archive ?
Transient weakness of the extremities can be referred to by several names: transient quadriparesis (TQ) or transient quadriplegia, cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN), and spinal cord concussion.
Torg et al (1) first described in 32 athletes the syndrome of cervical cord neurapraxia with transient quadriplegia.
Torg reevaluated the population of patients with cervical cord neurapraxia and compared them to a group of asymptomatic college and professional football players.
The management of athletes who have episodes of cervical cord neurapraxia is controversial.
Cantu (8) reported one episode of quadriplegia in an athlete with a previous episode of cervical cord neurapraxia.
There were no players with cervical cord neurapraxia.