cervical cap


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Related to cervical cap: spermicide

cap

 [kap]
1. a covering.
2. a maximum budgetary limit.
cervical cap a contraceptive device similar to the diaphragm but much smaller, consisting of a cup that fits directly over the cervix. It is only 60 per cent effective for women who have already given birth.
 The cervical cap is inserted much like the diaphragm. The woman should check to be certain that it is placed over the cervix. From McKinney et al., 2000.
cradle cap an oily yellowish crust that sometimes appears on the scalp of an infant, caused by excessive secretion by the sebaceous glands in the scalp. Treatment of mild cases consists of daily shampoo with mild soap. It can be loosened with an application of mineral oil or baby oil prior to shampooing. Called also milk crust and crusta lactea.

cer·vi·cal cap

a contraceptive diaphragm that fits over the cervix uteri.

cervical cap

n.
A small, rubber, cup-shaped contraceptive device that fits over the uterine cervix to prevent the entry of sperm.

cervical cap

a contraceptive device similar to the diaphragm but much smaller, consisting of a cup that fits directly over the cervix to prevent spermatozoa from entering the cervical canal. It is only 60% effective for women who have already given birth.
A barrier-type contraceptive consisting of a semirigid plastic cap that fits tightly over the uterine cervix, holding spermicide against it; CCs are functionally similar to diaphragms, but can be left in place for longer periods; CCs must be fitted, and they may not work on all women, due to cystocele or short anterior vaginal wall

cer·vi·cal cap

(sĕrvi-kăl kap)
Contraceptive diaphragm that fits over the cervix uteri.

cervical cap

See CAP CONTRACEPTIVE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cervical cap is an effective and convenient birth control method, comments Cynthia Pearson of the National Women's Health Network in Washington, D.
Although the Prentif Cavity-Rim Cervical Cap shares some of the drawbacks common to all barrier contraceptives, it is comparatively more convenient, more aesthetically pleasing, less expensive to use and allows for greater sexual spontaneity.
Condoms, diaphragms, sponges, and cervical caps are also referred to as barrier contraception methods.
Along with drugs (some of which are components of convergent technology, such as patches, implants and vaginal rings), women often use devices such as cervical caps, diaphragms, intrauterine devices, sponges, as well as sterilization clips and rings.
The result looks like an autobody shop remade with diaphragms and cervical caps.
Vulcanization also facilitated the development of female contraceptives by supplying the requisite technology for the manufacture of rubber cervical caps and diaphragms.
California midwife Elizabeth Davis has been fitting cervical caps since 1982, when she designed a study as part of FDA approval of the cap.
Non-hormonal methods include condoms, cervical caps, diaphragms, non-hormonal IUDs, sponges, and withdrawal methods.
Also during the war years, Marie Stopes' book, Wise Parenthood, discourages use of the condom and recommends women use small rubber cervical caps with quinine pessaries.
From Greek philosopher Aristotle recommending plant-based oils as a spermicide to legendary 18th century womanizer Casanova who experimented with a number of birth control methods including condoms made of linen and cervical caps fashioned out of empty half lemon rinds, contraception has been a fundamental, though often unmentioned, part of society.