cerium

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cerium

 (Ce) [sēr´e-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 58, atomic weight 140.12. (See Appendix 6.)

ce·ri·um (Ce),

(sēr'ē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]

cerium

/ce·ri·um/ (Ce) (sēr´e-um) a chemical element, at. no. 58.

cerium (Ce)

[sir′ē·əm]
Etymology: L, Ceres, Roman goddess of agriculture
a ductile gray rare earth element. Its atomic number is 58; its atomic mass is 140.13. A compound of cerium, cerium oxalate, is used as a sedative, an antiemetic, and an antitussive.

ce·ri·um

(Ce) (sēr'ē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]

ce·ri·um

(Ce) (sēr'ē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]

cerium,

n a ductile, gray rare-earth element. Cerium oxalate is used as a sedative, an antiemetic, and an antitussive. Cerium oxide is used in dental porcelains to stimulate the natural fluorescence found in human dental enamel.

cerium

a chemical element, atomic number 58, atomic weight 140.12, symbol Ce. See also Table 6.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if ceric species near the anode can be transported in low concentration to the anode, upon reduction and in the presence of chloride they may become soluble cerous species to be washed away from the anode by adventitious water and cannot precipitate as an insoluble salt to further passivate the corrosion site.
In cancer treatment, the main objective is to detect and destroy the can- cerous tumor as quickly as possible before it can spread to vital organs.
One commonly used method, their "Method A," is based on an initial mild chloric acid digestion to remove interfering substances, after which the iodine is quantified by its catalytic effect on reducing yellow ceric ion to colorless cerous ion in the presence of arsenious acid (Sandell-Kolthoff reaction).