ceroid


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ce·roid

(sē'royd),
A waxlike, golden, or yellow-brown pigment first found in fibrotic livers of choline-deficient rats, and also known to be present in some cirrhotic livers (and certain other tissues) of human beings. Ceroid is acid fast, insoluble in fat solvents, and probably a type of lipofuscin although differing from true lipofuscins by failing to stain with Schmorl ferric-ferricyanide reduction stain; it also exhibits autofluorescence. Accumulates in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.
[L. cera, wax, + G. eidos, appearance]

ceroid

[sir′oid]
Etymology: L, cera, wax; Gk, eidos, form
a golden, waxy pigment appearing in the cirrhotic livers of some individuals, in the GI tract, in the nervous system, and in the muscles. It is an insoluble, acid-fast, sudanophilic pigment.

ceroid

A complex of alcohol-insoluble, oxidised polyunsaturated lipid pigment(s) resulting from the peroxidation of unsaturated lipids, which are similar or identical to lipofuscin. Ceroid accumulates in macrophages of the heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and brain in the elderly, and is thus termed a “wear and tear” pigment; it has been inculpated in age-related organ dysfunction hypovitaminosis E, cathartic colon, and hereditary conditions (e.g., Batten’s disease and sea-blue histiocytosis).

ceroid

A complex of alcohol-insoluble, oxidized polyunsaturated lipid pigment(s) resulting from the peroxidation of unsaturated lipids that are similar or identical to lipofuscin; ceroid accumulates in macrophages of the heart, liver, GI tract, and brain in the elderly and is thus termed 'wear and tear' pigment; it has been inculpated in age-related organ dysfunction–see 'garbage can' hypothesis, hypovitaminosis E, cathartic colon, and hereditary conditions–eg, Batten's disease, sea-blue histiocytosis.

ceroid

an insoluble polymer of oxidized lipid and protein; an acid-fast, sudanophilic, pigment found in the liver, the nervous system and muscle. See also ceroid lipofuscinosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Davidson's team focused on the rare, inherited childhood disorder, late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, also called Batten disease.
1,2,3,25-32) Additionally, fat is discolored yellow or red-brown because of the deposition of ceroid or lipofuscin pigment within adipose cells.
Specifically, there are yellow-brown, ceroid, lipofuscin-like (cerumen) pigment granules within the cytoplasm of these luminal cells, which are surrounded by basal, myoepithelial cells lined up along the basement membrane.
Decreased proteolysis caused by protein aggregates, inclusion bodies, plaques, lipofuscin, ceroid, and 'aggresomes' during oxidative stress, aging, and disease.
It is the most common form of a group of disorders called neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (or NCLs).
Though rare, it is the most common form of a group of disorders called neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.
The novel neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis gene MFSD8 encodes a putative lysosomal transporter.
Nevertheless, consumption of excessive amounts of PUFA has been suggested to potentially lead to increased cancer incidence, free radical damage to cells, skin lesions, an increase in serum uric acid, and enhancement of ceroid production.
Lafora disease, Unverricht-Lundborg disease , mitochondrial diseases, sialidosis, and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis).
AAV2-mediated ocular gene therapy for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.