ceroid


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ce·roid

(sē'royd),
A waxlike, golden, or yellow-brown pigment first found in fibrotic livers of choline-deficient rats, and also known to be present in some cirrhotic livers (and certain other tissues) of human beings. Ceroid is acid fast, insoluble in fat solvents, and probably a type of lipofuscin although differing from true lipofuscins by failing to stain with Schmorl ferric-ferricyanide reduction stain; it also exhibits autofluorescence. Accumulates in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.
[L. cera, wax, + G. eidos, appearance]

ceroid

[sir′oid]
Etymology: L, cera, wax; Gk, eidos, form
a golden, waxy pigment appearing in the cirrhotic livers of some individuals, in the GI tract, in the nervous system, and in the muscles. It is an insoluble, acid-fast, sudanophilic pigment.

ceroid

A complex of alcohol-insoluble, oxidised polyunsaturated lipid pigment(s) resulting from the peroxidation of unsaturated lipids, which are similar or identical to lipofuscin. Ceroid accumulates in macrophages of the heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and brain in the elderly, and is thus termed a “wear and tear” pigment; it has been inculpated in age-related organ dysfunction hypovitaminosis E, cathartic colon, and hereditary conditions (e.g., Batten’s disease and sea-blue histiocytosis).

ceroid

A complex of alcohol-insoluble, oxidized polyunsaturated lipid pigment(s) resulting from the peroxidation of unsaturated lipids that are similar or identical to lipofuscin; ceroid accumulates in macrophages of the heart, liver, GI tract, and brain in the elderly and is thus termed 'wear and tear' pigment; it has been inculpated in age-related organ dysfunction–see 'garbage can' hypothesis, hypovitaminosis E, cathartic colon, and hereditary conditions–eg, Batten's disease, sea-blue histiocytosis.

ceroid

an insoluble polymer of oxidized lipid and protein; an acid-fast, sudanophilic, pigment found in the liver, the nervous system and muscle. See also ceroid lipofuscinosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
has been granted Orphan Drug Designation for PLX-200 for the treatment of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the company said.
Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a severe lysosomal disease caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme Palmitoyl- Protein-Thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and result in osmiophilic granules accumulating in lysosomes and leading to neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and death.
This treatment is meant to benefit patients 3-years-old and older with late infantile neuronal ceroid.
Pulmonary involvement in HPS is characterized by accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within the lung, manifested by the presence of clear, vacuolated, ceroid-laden type 2 pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages (Figure 7, B through D) that are typically found in a background of prominent interstitial fibrosis.
CLN2 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), collectively referred to as Batten disease, a rare inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system.
Mackin (1951) noted that ceroid bodies increased in number with increasing infection intensity of Perkinsus marinus.
Non-invasive assessment of retinal alterations in mouse models of infantile and juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.
Tandem mass spectrometry assays of palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 and tripeptidyl peptidase activity in dried blood spots for the detection of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses in newborns.
1,2,3,25-32) Additionally, fat is discolored yellow or red-brown because of the deposition of ceroid or lipofuscin pigment within adipose cells.
It is thought that lipid-protein complex ceroid lipofuscin which is deposited because of disruption in the lysosomes is also involved in pulmonary fibrosis.