cerebration


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cerebration

 [ser″ĕ-bra´shun]
normal and appropriate activity of the brain.

cer·e·bra·tion

(ser'ĕ-brā'shŭn),
Activity of the mental processes; thinking.
See also: mentation, cognition.

cerebration

/cer·e·bra·tion/ (ser″ah-bra´shun) functional activity of the brain.

cer·e·bra·tion

(ser'ĕ-brā'shŭn)
Activity of the mental processes; thinking.
See also: cognition

cerebration

Thinking.

cer·e·bra·tion

(ser'ĕ-brā'shŭn)
Activity of the mental processes; thinking.
See also: mentation, cognition

cerebration

functional activity of the brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also influences types of cerebration such as detailed memories and memories that require more than one sensory modality.
Gornick is a sound critic rather than a high-jumping one, her prose mostly straight-forward rather than sparkling; there is little of John Updike's reach for the unexpected but apposite image or Cynthia Ozick's dense cerebration.
This method, if it was a method, relied on the fact that he had in fact said something worth further cerebration.
Fortunately, the bulbar polio left me with no residual, except for possible weakness in cerebration.
Weaving the textual threads of a language that had not been natively spoken for almost two thousand years into a medium of modern communication and cerebration remains a challenge for every Israeli author to this day.
Unconscious cerebration may have been going on, but it was absolutely unconscious.
Energy spent in cerebration was of course lost to reproduction, and the intellectual maiden became a sterile matron.
It has no specific action on the heart or circulation; none on respiration, cerebration, or elimination; nor, where it is most highly prized, on the reproduction system.
We have started the cerebration of Mendel in February this year and look for cooperation with other university's museums and we found great cooperation with NCKU Museum," said Dr.
More than 300 guests including government officials of South Korea, K s peer companies, suppliers, and local universities attended the cerebration event in Seoul.
All of which may make it seem that "The Painted World" conveyed serious cerebration, which it did, but perhaps it struck its points most slyly by the eye-popping color-coded groupings, as when one turned from the shiny, galactic candy fun of John Tremblay's Ice Age, 2005, to a room of oxygenated reds: a florid Yayoi Kusama; a bopping, hypnotic Dan Walsh diptych; and a cheery lifesaver by Olivier Mosset.