cerebral malaria


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ce·re·bral ma·lar·i·a

a form of falciparum malaria characterized by cerebral involvement, with extreme hyperthermia and headache, and a case fatality rate of about 50%.

cerebral malaria

Falciparum malaria in which the brain is affected. This fulminant disease often produces coma, shock, or sudden death.
See also: malaria
References in periodicals archive ?
Convulsions due to increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier in experimental cerebral malaria can be prevented by splenectomy or anti T-cell treatment.
Cerebral malaria is a severe, potentially fatal neurologic complication of infection by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum.
1) Cerebral malaria, a prominent manifestation of falciparum malaria, carries a 15-20% mortality which rises above 30% with multi-organ involvement.
These occur primarily in a patient with cerebral malaria and are due to anaemia, vascular occlusion, inflammation and increased intracranial pressure.
is severe, it is also called cerebral malaria, as blood is restricted to the brain.
CD36 polymorphism is associated with protection from cerebral malaria.
In murine models, pro-oxidants such as fish oil have been shown to protect against experimental cerebral malaria infection, especially in the presence of vitamin C and E [12], but this relationship in humans is not well understood.
Cerebral malaria causes problems with memory and learning that can last for years, and is the principal cause of death from the disease.
Topics include designing and building better nursing homes and facilities for the aging by partnering brain scientists and architects, using neuroimaging to find the links learning about prions to understand such conditions as mad cow disease, protecting the brain from glutamate, defeating cerebral malaria, balancing the risk and rewards of DNA technologies, medicating the bumps of everyday life, learning from injured brains, seeking free will, evaluating stress and disease, adapting after injury, learning in the basal ganglia, and the effects of Alzheimer's disease on everyday judgment.
He came back to work in Britain after being pronounced clinically dead in hospital in north-western Kenya, after contracting cerebral malaria.
Not much progress in treatment of cerebral malaria.