cerebral hypoxia


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Related to cerebral hypoxia: cerebral hemorrhage

cerebral hypoxia

↓ O2 in brain; depending on the duration and severity, Sx range from mild–eg, lethargy to serious neurologic damage–eg, coma, seizures, death

cerebral hypoxia

Lack of oxygen supply to the brain, usually as a result of either diminished blood flow (such as in traumatic childbirth or cardiopulmonary arrest) or diminished oxygenation of the blood (such as in high-altitude exposures or patients with advanced cardiopulmonary disease). If nothing is done to treat this condition, irreversible anoxic damage to the brain begins after 4 to 6 min and sooner in some cases. If basic resuscitation measures are begun before the end of this period, the onset of cerebral death may be postponed.
See: cardiopulmonary resuscitation
See also: hypoxia

hypoxia

a broad term meaning diminished availability of oxygen to the body tissues.
Its causes are many and varied. There may be a deficiency of oxygen in the atmosphere, as in altitude sickness, or a pulmonary disorder that interferes with adequate ventilation of the lungs. Anemia or circulatory deficiencies can lead to inadequate transport and delivery of oxygen to the tissues. Finally, edema or other abnormal conditions of the tissues themselves may impair the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the capillaries and the tissues. The effect of hypoxia is to reduce the functional activity of tissues. The initial response may be one of temporarily increased activity. Terminally the tissue may be irreparably damaged.

anemic hypoxia
due to inadequate supply of hemoglobin in the blood.
cerebral hypoxia
may be acute or chronic causing either a tremor-convulsion syndrome or one of longer term weakness, ataxia, apparent blindness and lethargy.
fetal hypoxia
occurs as a result of deprivation of the fetus of oxygen during parturition, because it is delayed or the umbilical cord pinched off. Clinically there is weakness, imbecility, disinclination to suck, possibly hypothermia. Foals experience a much more violent, convulsive or dummy syndrome. See also neonatal maladjustment syndrome. Called also intrapartum hypoxia.
intrapartum hypoxia
see fetal hypoxia (above).
ischemic hypoxia
insufficient oxygen in tissues because of an inadequate blood supply.
stagnant hypoxia
inadequate supply of oxygen to tissues because of slow rate of passage of the blood through the tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects induced by cyanide are analogous to some metabolite disorders seen in patients who suffer from cerebral hypoxia (6, 7).
Effect of beta-hydroxybutyrate, a cerebral function improving agent, on cerebral hypoxia, anoxia and ischemia in mice and rats.
Cerebral hypoxia will progress until it becomes irreversible and death occurs.
2] in traumatic brain injury: Effect of cerebral hypoxia on outcome.
She added that Phipps suffered cerebral hypoxia and that a urine test found cocaine and benzodiazopine in his system.
Once an initial injury to the brain has occurred, the cascade of events that follows includes altered cerebral perfusion, increased intracranial pressure, and cerebral hypoxia, which all increase the risk of ischemia.
If fetal cerebral hypoxia is detected early, measures can be taken, including cesarean section, to remedy the situation and preserve normal brain function.
Continuous brain tissue oxygen monitoring is a method to measure oxygen delivery and identify cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in patients with brain injury, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, malignant stroke, or other patients at risk for secondary brain injury.
2] values; therefore aggressive treatment is not necessary as signs of cerebral hypoxia are not apparent.
Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia are two of the most important causes of secondary injury after brain trauma.
Sugioka K, Davis DA: Hyperventilation with oxygen- a possible cause of cerebral hypoxia.
In addition, a shift in the hemoglobin-oxygen saturation curve in the presence of alkalosis, known as the Bohr effect, may have caused the degree of cerebral hypoxia to be underestimated, since oxygen saturation measurements do not reflect hemoglobin-oxygen affinity.