cerebellar lesions

cerebellar lesions

- Table 1
Table 1: Characteristic limb effects of cerebellar lesions
CharacteristicMuscular effects
DyssynergyMuscular decomposition
Accessory muscles used to achieve voluntary movements
Wide arc movements and past pointing
Aesthenia
Hyporeflexia
DysrhythmiaAbnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements
Abnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements during gait
DysmetriaThe loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement
The loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement during gait
Abnormal gaitUncoordinated ataxic gait
Wide-based gait
Slow, jerky, irregular cadence
Variation of stride length and foot placement from step to step, often with loss of balance
'Double tap' foot sounds, where foot contact occurs audibly in two phases: heel strike and toe contact
Constant postural adjustment
References in periodicals archive ?
It is in this sense that the authors adduce that cerebellar lesions resulting in impairment of various executive tasks are actually the functions that require covert speech; thus, they emphasize the timing hypothesis.
A study in humans showed that cerebellar lesions are associated with a decrease in the activity of the amygdala as well as of the cingulated gyrus (18).
Multiple lesions were seen in 10 patients; in 2, a single lesion was seen in the centrum semi-ovale, and bilateral cerebellar lesions were seen in 1.
Cerebellar lesions involving the floccular region also reduce or eliminate OKNe towards the side of the lesion.
Consequences of cerebellar lesions at early and later ages: clinical relevance of animal experiments.
Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed T1-low and T2-high bulbopontine and cerebellar lesions around the fourth ventricle (Figure).
The postcontrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) scan revealed solid, enhancing cerebellar lesions (Figure 1), which (along with the ocular lesion) were characteristic findings of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease.
Cerebellar lesions can result in severe postural disturbance.
Cerebellar lesions - The cerebellum functions as the calibrator and repair-shop for eye movements, playing an important role in controlling the pulse, step and correct combination, which holds the eyes in position.